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Behaviour

TJ100TJ100 Member Posts: 3
edited August 2016 in Parents and carers
Hi,

I have a son, Scott who is aged 7, actually he is 8 in a couple of weeks. Scott was diagnosed with a LH which was diagnosed within a day of his birth.

I am very pleased to say that Scott is doing incredibly well, he does have increased muscle tone on the left side and does have botox injections in his left leg and has just had serial casting to help get his foot flat and we are very happy with the results. Up until last September Scott attended his local Primary school, we were very apprehensive when he first attended as we were not sure how the other children would take to Scott because he was

Replies

  • EmbroideryCircleEmbroideryCircle Member Posts: 1

    Don't worry, stay strong and don't let him see that you are losing your temper. In the past I've sometimes lost my temper and in a "right that's it frame" of mind said that there would be no screens, no fun, early bed, no sweets, basically any thing I could think of, only to recant when calmed down which doesn't help the child at all.              Help Scott learn that there will be consequences for poor behaviour, but also treats for good behaviour, such as not being able to watch the TV or having to sit quietly for 5 minutes if he behaves poorly and an extra story at bed time or another 15minutes TV/DVD if he's been especially good.                                                            

    It's all part of the journey of parenthood and our children growing. HIs laughing at you is a common reaction in children  to being told off.  Sometimes children laugh when they feel embarassed at being in trouble and sometimes they laugh because they realise that we are losing control.  Children learn how to behave and control their temper by modelling what they see those around them doing. So if  a parent is calm and respectful that behavaiur can be learned by a child.  My 4 children all need different styles of parenting, you've got to work out what works for you and Scott.  Once you do, as long as you are  consistent, keep your temper and stick to your guns (even if you're having to bite back your temper at the time), Scott will be fine and you will stay in control of the situation.

     

     

  • lindslinds Member Posts: 7
    check Scott's fatigue levels in school as poor behaviour at home can be caused by no time out of stress in school. I have spoken to lots of primary and secondary childrne who are ambulant and they dont like to tell their parents tha they are nto coping. they think they just have toget on with it but schools can and should think about fatigue as EVERY child with cp gets more tired and expends more energy when they walk about and most expend more energy trying to control their posture when seated.

    there is a managing fatigeue checklist and planner on the (free to parents) blue inclusion disc from scope early years

    request a free parent disc from [email protected]
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