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Is your child a Beaver, Cub or Scout?

AlexAlex Posts: 1,325Scope Team Scope community team



Would you like them to be? Have you had a great experience – or have you faced difficulties in getting involved?

We're working with The Scout Association on a project that aims to get more disabled children and young people involved in the Scouts. We're looking to hear from people who have had good/bad experiences.

If you’d like to share your experience confidentially please email [email protected]

Thanks!

Replies

  • ClairesianClairesian Posts: 3Member
    edited September 2015
    My daughter is 7 and is just about to start beavers but I need an over 18 to accompany her, I'm not the best person to go as she'll just sit on my lap but I can't find anyone willing to take her as its only an hour a week.
  • abstractLucasabstractLucas Posts: 79Member Connected
    I'd love my son to be able to go to Scouts - he's 14 (today in fact!) and his 12 year old brother and 11 year old sister both go. Problem is that when your child has quite intense needs, even if they would accept him, I wouldn't be able to relax as I'd worry that he wouldn't be understood, or he'd fall over, or have a nosebleed, or a fit, or dislocate his jaw! I'm also wary that while his level of learning difficulty means he doesn't really see himself as different, that he'd end up being left out because he just wouldn't understand what's going on. I have heard something about a scout group being set up here (Bristol) for young people with additional needs, but haven't been able to track any more details, and besides often groups that are set up like that seem to be able to cater for fairly low level asd type needs but would be flummoxed by my son!
    Does your child already attend a scout group? How has it been for them (and you!)?
  • 7Elen7Elen Posts: 8Member Listener
    edited November 2015
    A very bad experience.
  • kingboy25kingboy25 Posts: 139Member Listener
    My son who has cerebral palsy was a member of beavers and cubs and was fully included. He used his walking frame while in beavers and started to use his wheelchair when he went up to cubs. A scout used to come in on cubs night and he thoroughly enjoyed being pushed round at high speed and joined in all the rowdy games. The same scout who had then moved on to the senior section also supported him in scouts until he was fourteen when he (my son) decided he would rather stay in and watch football on tv. My son has no learning difficulties and the beaver leader admitted that he was easer to integrate than a previous child who had learning difficulties. The mother of the child with learning difficulties introduced me to this beaver group so I would guess she was satisfied with his treatment.
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