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What do you think of 'disability dolls'?

Chris_ScopeChris_Scope Member Posts: 695 Pioneering
edited September 2016 in Disabled people
Barbie in a wheelchairThe Mail Online reported today on pictures of Harper Beckham at Los Angeles airport carrying a disabled blonde doll, while father David carried the doll's wheelchair. The article asks  'Is it healthy to give a child a disability doll?', and writer Sarah Vine goes on to discuss the growing popularity of such dolls, questioning whether they are a positive move in the children's toy market, or in poor taste.

What do you think? Are you pleased by the introduction of such toys, or do you feel differently? Are there any specific dolls you'd like to see made?

We'd love to know what you think, so let us know by commenting below.  

Replies

  • whatever2016whatever2016 Member Posts: 8
    I suppose as a disabled person It gives those without the label a measure to familiarize themselves with the label of other disabled people. (Physical or Mental health condition also)
  • basiclee08basiclee08 Member Posts: 71 Courageous
    I see no harm in them per say. About 50years to late now kids use mobile phones and gaming. Kids are so quick to adapt. 
  • RhonaRhona Member Posts: 13 Courageous
    I think it's great that disabilities become a part of life in general rather than just an 'oddity' when youngsters come across someone in a wheelchair.
  • QWERTYQWERTY Member Posts: 1 Listener
    I think it's really good to have disability dolls. Dolls are part of how children learn about and create their own understanding of the world around them. Playing with say a doll is about learning and replicating how they react in the real world - how 'baby' is looked after, what happens when a 'child' is sick and needs doctor or hospital, what adults do on a 'night out' etc. A disabled doll enables and encourages them to react to a disabled person, allows them to think about and play with their reactions before they meet that person. It allows then to get used to that person existing in their world and hopefully makes it seem 'normal' and possible to adapt to.

  • quinrahquinrah Member Posts: 24 Courageous

    I think those are some great points @QWERTY

    For me it's a good thing to have more diverse toys and dolls available.

  • LauraRutherfordLauraRutherford Member Posts: 16 Courageous
    I think it's fantastic. So glad as it helps to normalise disability and I suppose also helps #endtheawkward too. 

    I wish that children had these dolls to play with in nursery for that reason. 

    Its lovely for parents of children with disabilities to be able to buy a toy that their child can relate to. 

    I remember reading the DM article and posting on Scope's Facebook post about this, but I thought the fact that Barbie with a wheelchair was discontinued because it didn't fit in her dream house was so apt. Especially as it sold out. It mirrors life in a lot of ways with accessibility problems being swept under the carpet. 
  • FootlooseFootloose Member Posts: 21 Listener
    I think they are a great idea; Laura's last sentence, about it also indirectly highlighting a number accessibility issues in the real world being swept under the carpet is a very valid point and may well in time, get those who have been sweeping the stuff there, looking under various carpets. It may lead to people looking outside their particular 'boxes' and realising that their "Oh, 'that' will or might offend disabled people' is in some cases, being used as a lame excuse for not doing what they could, or should.
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