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Medical exemption certificate/ Free Prescriptions

Sam_ScopeSam_Scope Member Posts: 7,732 Disability Gamechanger
I know that prescription costs are an issue for most of us and I have spoken to a few people recently who werent aware that they could receive either free prescriptions or reduced cost through pre paid cards, so here is a bit of information from the NHS website.

You can get free NHS prescriptions if you:
  • are 60 or over
  • are under 16
  • are 16-18 and in full-time education
  • are pregnant or have had a baby in the previous 12 months and have a valid maternity exemption certificate.
  • have a specified medical condition and have a valid medical exemption certificate 
  • have a continuing physical disability that prevents you from going out without help from another person and have a valid MedEx
  • hold a valid war pension exemption certificate and the prescription is for your accepted disability
  • are an NHS inpatient
You are also entitled to free prescriptions if you or your partner – including civil partner – receive, or you're under the age of 20 and the dependant of someone receiving:
  • Income Support, Universal Credit (in certain circumstances - please see here), Income-based Jobseeker’s Allowance, Income-related Employment and Support Allowance or Pension Credit Guarantee Credit;
  • through NHS Tax Credit Exemption Certificates, if they or their partner receive Tax Credits and satisfy the conditions to receive a certificate;
  • through NHS maternity exemption certificates, if they are pregnant or have had a baby in the last 12 months;
  • through the NHS Low Income Scheme, because they have a low income.
Medical exemption certificates are issued on application to people who have:
  • a permanent fistula (for example caecostomy, colostomy, laryngostomy or ileostomy) requiring continuous surgical dressing or requiring an appliance
  • a form of hypoadrenalism (for example Addison's disease) for which specific substitution therapy is essential
  • diabetes insipidus or other forms of hypopituitarism
  • diabetes mellitus, except where treatment is by diet alone
  • hypoparathyroidism
  • myasthenia gravis
  • myxoedema (that is, hypothyroidism requiring thyroid hormone replacement)
  • epilepsy requiring continuous anticonvulsive therapy
  • a continuing physical disability which means the person cannot go out without the help of another person. Temporary disabilities do not count even if they last for several months
Or are undergoing treatment for cancer:
  • including the effects of cancer, or
  • the effects of current or previous cancer treatment
NHS prescription costs
  • The current prescription charge is £8.40 per item (£16.80 per pair of elastic hosiery).
  • A three monthly PPC is £29.10 and could save you money if you need more than three prescribed items in three months.  
  • A 12-month certificate is £104.00 and could save you money if you need more than 12 prescribed items in a year.
PPCs are available by 10 monthly direct debit instalment payments. The prescription prepayment certificates allow anyone to obtain all the prescriptions they need for £2 per week. 


Scope
Senior online community officer

Replies

  • [Deleted User][Deleted User] Posts: 0 Pioneering
    The user and all related content has been deleted.
  • Sam_ScopeSam_Scope Member Posts: 7,732 Disability Gamechanger
    @mumof3boys no you definitely shouldn't do that, that would be fraud and is illegal. 
    Scope
    Senior online community officer
  • Sam_ScopeSam_Scope Member Posts: 7,732 Disability Gamechanger
    "Dishonestly claiming that you are exempt from charges is unlawful and denies the NHS vital revenue. Regular checks are carried out on treatment and prescriptions that are not paid for, meaning you could be asked to provide proof of your exemption at a later date.  

    Patients found to have wrongly claimed to be exempt from charges will have to pay the charge due, plus a penalty charge of up to £100. They may also be prosecuted for an offence that can lead to a criminal record." (Via NHS)

    Scope
    Senior online community officer
  • [Deleted User][Deleted User] Posts: 0 Pioneering
    The user and all related content has been deleted.
  • Sam_ScopeSam_Scope Member Posts: 7,732 Disability Gamechanger
    If he isnt entitled to free prescriptions then yes, you have to pay.
    Scope
    Senior online community officer
  • [Deleted User][Deleted User] Posts: 0 Pioneering
    The user and all related content has been deleted.
  • wasbulliedwasbullied Member Posts: 3 Listener
    hi i'm  a  new person from California

    most of Rx's are covered under my med insurance


    if there something I need it's covered, my plan doctor


    put's the paperwork into my chart like an reaction


    to a medication, they would write me another Rx


    or a condition they would request it.


    and I pay my normal Co-pays.. hope this helps


    wasbullied.
  • wasbulliedwasbullied Member Posts: 3 Listener
    the insurance in the uk has better  coverage


    but my plan is pretty good my tkr was 45 K cost me 50.00 for hospital bills

    around 1k for someone to take care of me and run arrands  for me


    350.00  for rx after doctors visits and pt clinic stuff
  • paulaRpaulaR Member Posts: 6 Listener
    I was on ESA in the support group but then they put me into the work related activity group n my free prescription card ran out and they haven't sent me another does this mean I have to pay for my prescriptions.
  • [Deleted User][Deleted User] Posts: 0 Pioneering
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  • MolMol Member Posts: 52 Connected
    I am diabetic(diet controlled) I have another 3 life long conditions, I currently work and I am not entitled to free prescriptions.

    My GP keeps wanting me to try different types of medication but none of them ever seem to work.

    I have a cupboard full of tablets which I have paid for but cannot take.

    I am happy to pay for tablets if they work but my GP's will not have it,

    If I don't say I will try them, they say I have refused treatment so in a no win situation.

    I am now back on a low dose of Gabapentin which do nothing for my pain, but I have to keep taking them. 

    As far as I am aware the only time I can get free medication is if they give it at hospital.
  • [Deleted User][Deleted User] Posts: 0 Pioneering
    The user and all related content has been deleted.
  • [Deleted User][Deleted User] Posts: 0 Pioneering
    The user and all related content has been deleted.
  • MolMol Member Posts: 52 Connected
    I have basically been told even though I am classed as type 2 diabetic until I actually start taking metformin I will not be entitled to free prescription. 

    I am not sure if that is correct so if anyone knows different your reply would be appreciated.
  • estellosaurusestellosaurus Member Posts: 6 Connected
    I've had free prescriptions since I was 16, mine are covered under the permanent fistula part, although I don't have a fistula, I do have to use a device.
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