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PIP Mobility

Can somebody please explain to me exactly what "able to plan and follow a route" exactly means on PIP assessment.  I have posted about my PIP decision but it is  this question that i got no points for and to me it seems  a redicilious question that i dont really understand

Replies

  • NystagmiteNystagmite Posts: 609Member Pioneering
    edited June 2017
    It's to do with going out safely. it doesn't take into account whether you walk (that's the other part) into account. It's things like - can you cross the road safely, can you read a map, bus timetable, etc. Can you get from A to B (familiar or unfamiliar) safely, do you wander off, etc.

    You have to consider everything. I, for example, have mild hearing loss, (and various other hearing issues) Autism and partial sight. I got higher mobility (I have no problems walking; so got 12 points just on that) because I can't get around safely because I can't see or hear well enough to see where traffic comes from. Whilst I can plan a follow a journey (mostly) that's something like "get on a train at Plymouth at get off at Newton Abbot". You couldn't give me a map, tell me we're here and tell me to get to B safely. 
  • chaziechazie Posts: 6Member Listener
    Thank you for explaining, unfortunately its my body that dont work well not my mind, although because of breathing problems (Sarcoidosis, asthma and COPD) I get very anxious about going out (never go out alone) as i can have an attack at any time and then become very breathless and need nebuliser which i keep in car.  I also check about parking stairs etc before i go anywhere and usually do a test run so i know exactly where it is etc
  • NystagmiteNystagmite Posts: 609Member Pioneering
    That wouldn't count. You'd only get PIP on the basis that you can't walk very far. The "planning and following a journey" is for people with sensory, learning and mental health difficulties. It doesn't include people who have breathing difficulties who get anxious about getting out.
  • dedusdedus Posts: 25Member Connected
    I got awarded 4 points for not being able to plan a journey , because I have mental health issues , which lead to other issues , so sometimes it's not the main descriptor ie anxiety ! But what anxiety can lead to such as depression , lack of self awareness , 
    pack of motivation , causing shall we say certain mental illness , you have to look at the criteria for a certain task ie ( planning a journey ) and then see if any of the descriptors apply to you , directly or indirectly , hope this dosent sond to complicated , 
  • hev123456hev123456 Posts: 1Member Listener
    I cant walk very far as im waiting two knee replacements and have spinal problems i stumble alot and loose balance i rely on my mobility car and im really scared that going from dla to pip i will loose it i suffer from rhueumotoyd and osteo arthritus 
  • chaziechazie Posts: 6Member Listener
    I also have knee and spinal problems but because of breathing problems they cant operate, i have fallen on a number of occasions and also rely on my mobility car but unfortunately it looks like i am going to loose it which means i will have to rely on other people to get me around as i cannot manage public transport, bus stop 1/2 mile away and was retired from work on health grounds so cannot afford a car on my benefits.  I am going to tribunal but awaiting a date
  • MatildaMatilda Posts: 2,616Member Disability Gamechanger
    I understand that people are now allowed to keep their mobility cars pending the outcome of their appeals.
  • abbatony4950abbatony4950 Posts: 10Member Listener
    What I found in my opinion that all the questions on the PIP forms are that they seem to be in favour of the DWP.  I have been to the tribunal and they have approved my case but the DWP are still going to contest it,What more do I have to do to prove I am disabled.
  • wildlifewildlife Posts: 1,316Member Pioneering
    @abbatony4950 If you mean you've received a letter saying the DWP have 28 days to appeal the decision. This is standard practice and they can only appeal on a point of law which is rare, so although you then have to wait longer to get your payments it's not quite the threat it appears to be.  
  • NystagmiteNystagmite Posts: 609Member Pioneering
    What I found in my opinion that all the questions on the PIP forms are that they seem to be in favour of the DWP.  I have been to the tribunal and they have approved my case but the DWP are still going to contest it,What more do I have to do to prove I am disabled.
    You'd get better answers if you start your own thread
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