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Son has no social skills so he's needs a good old fashioned one to one job

daisydoodaisydoo Posts: 1Member Listener
Hi...its my son with the disability...he has Expressed and is almost 23. We have been with lots of organisations but no one can seem to fund hum work...he has no social skills so he's needs a good old fashioned one to one job..someone to train him and then let him get on with it...he can't do college as too many people. Surely we can't be alone in this. There must be someone else like my son...he feels worthless and wonders is this off I me....i so feel for him...anyone got any suggestions xz

Replies

  • CockneyRebelCockneyRebel Posts: 5,255Community champion Disability Gamechanger
    You don't say what your sons interests are which is important. What sort of things does he like to do ? does he like to use his hands? 
    Be all you can be, make  every day count. Namaste
  • GeoarkGeoark Posts: 1,222Community champion Pioneering
    Hi @daisydoo and welcome to the community.

    Remploy specialise in helping disabled people get into work, their online advisers may be able to assist. http://www.remploy.co.uk

    Mencap work with disability friendly organisations and businesses to help young disabled people find work placements. https://www.mencap.org.uk/get-involved/learning-disability-work-experience-week They also work with employers to provide work experience at other times than just the designated work experience week.

    Lack of social skills need not stop him getting work, though he will likely find the work environment challenging until he finds his way of dealing with things. However a lot does depend on other skills.

    Basic computer skills, good concentration and an eye for detail jobs like data entry should be achievable. Just be aware that a lot of offices are either open plan or heading that way, but with a good work load it is easy to get into your work and ignore what is going on around you.

    Warehousing can be good if he can read and count. There are a number of roles including, unloading stock, checking stock, putting stock away, picking, packing and other roles.

    Print finishers often need staff to stand at the back of machines and pack leaflets into boxes as they come off. One of the most boring jobs I have had, but it paid. Similar type of role was working in a fruit packers. The advantage to these jobs was being able to just do the work with minimal social interaction.

    Depending on where you live there may some seasonal work available locally.

    Some of these may depend on the disability your son has, and his physical fitness.

    Alternatively I would also suggest you son consider voluntary work.  This would give him experience working and give him ideas on what he might like to do, or just as important what he does not want to do. There is no failure in trying something and finding it is not for you.

    As an individual I stood alone.
    As a member of a group I did things.
    As part of a community I helped to create change!

  • alibabaalibaba Posts: 1Member Listener
    daisydoo said:
    Hi...its my son with the disability...he has Expressed and is almost 23. We have been with lots of organisations but no one can seem to fund hum work...he has no social skills so he's needs a good old fashioned one to one job..someone to train him and then let him get on with it...he can't do college as too many people. Surely we can't be alone in this. There must be someone else like my son...he feels worthless and wonders is this off I me....i so feel for him...anyone got any suggestions xz
    Hi as your son is under 25 could he still use the young person career advisory service they can help him with applying for apprenticeships and they have lists there are also part apprenticeships so your son can take things at his pace. My son ha's just left 6th  form and the careers advisor helped jack apply. Sons don't like taking there mothers advice  but the same advice from someone else makes  perfect sense to them.I also think it would be beneficial  in helping your son confidence grow by being involved 1to 1 with 
     the guidance councillor. Afte the age of 25 they don't come under the service as far a I kno hope this helps.

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