If this is your first visit, check out the community guide. You will have to Join us or Sign in before you can post.

Having difficulties logging in or resetting your password?


Please email [email protected]

what is an OT

stevek84stevek84 Posts: 24Member Connected
edited December 2017 in Disabled people
hello i believe im due to have an OT home visit i assume to asses care needs, is there anytjing i should know going in and what should i expect? i have anxiety and agoraphobia so any way to ease the anxiety could help. thanks

Replies

  • Sam_ScopeSam_Scope Posts: 7,732Administrator Scope community team
    Hi @stevek84
    Occupational therapy provides support to people whose health prevents them doing the activities that matter to them.
    An occupational therapist can identify strengths and difficulties you may have in everyday life, such as dressing or getting to the shops, and will help you work out practical solutions.
    They can work with you to identify goals that can help you maintain, regain, or improve your independence by using different techniques, changing your environment, and using new equipment.

    This is from the NHS website, I hope it helps.

    I moved your post to the ask an OT category so you can chat more with @Jean_Scope 

    It can be difficult when you have anxiety, but I think it is really positive that you are reaching out and talking to us about it :)

    Scope
    Senior online community officer
  • stevek84stevek84 Posts: 24Member Connected
    yes thats the one im supposed to be seeing but unsure when or if its even happening now at all i cant work these people out its like they try to make it as confusing as possible my head is spinning its doing my health nerves anxiety no good at all but i am trying. thanks i fidn post there i thnk but unsure so thabks for moving it to relevant place either way. Steven
  • TopkittenTopkitten Posts: 1,003Member Pioneering
    Occupational Therapy will only assess your home and see if it is, or can be made, suitable for your situation. They aren't really going to assess you in terms of benefits so shouldn't be anything to worry about. Most likely they will simply pass you onto a technician who will come and fit things or provide things to make life easier. At least that was what happened to me.

    TK
    "I'm on the wrong side of heaven and the righteous side of hell" - from Wrong side of heaven by Five Finger Death Punch.
  • stevek84stevek84 Posts: 24Member Connected
    hello TK ah maybe thats why the visit hasnt happened yet then as i am in process of house move maybe they are waiting to see where im at first but im also due a care needs assesment so i also thought the OT would be performing that? thanks for the insight much appreciated it all helps reduce the anxiety of the situation thankyou.
  • punkpunk Posts: 21Member Connected
    Im not sure if you claim any benefits but make sure you keep any paperwork or reports from your OT visit, this will help & count as evidence for any future pip claims if you need any aids. 
  • stevek84stevek84 Posts: 24Member Connected
    hello punk, yes i am on ESA but was on DLA but didnt get letter to change to PIP but started new claim for PIP recently so due to be assesed if they need/want to so thats great advice if the OT visit happens before any PIP assesment. thanks again
  • TopkittenTopkitten Posts: 1,003Member Pioneering
    Social Care and OT assessments are completely separate, though normally SC won't assess until OT have completed theirs. It is unlikely that OT will do anything until after the move as they cannot assess the new home until you are in it. There is little point assessing you before you move unless you are in desperate need of something and you will not be moving soon.

    TK
    "I'm on the wrong side of heaven and the righteous side of hell" - from Wrong side of heaven by Five Finger Death Punch.
  • stevek84stevek84 Posts: 24Member Connected
    ok i was under the impression the OT would be doing the assesment for care needs, thanks for clarifying ita all very confusing to me so having that clarity really helps, yes i can appreciate that as when it was discussed i said i dont need help or any aids fitted as im able to meet my needs in this property and i would like to stay but dont think thats possible so it makes sense for them to wait. thanks TK 
  • TopkittenTopkitten Posts: 1,003Member Pioneering
    I thought I didn't need anything to but they gave me a chair for the kitchen which was a better height than normal chairs. A frame for the toilet to make it easier to sit down and get up again. Some hand rails by the front and back doors and the bed. So I could get in and out easier and a seat in the shower so I wouldn't be at risk of falling over. A few smaller items just to help with bits and pieces.

    It was surprising how much easier they made things for me.

    TK
    "I'm on the wrong side of heaven and the righteous side of hell" - from Wrong side of heaven by Five Finger Death Punch.
  • stevek84stevek84 Posts: 24Member Connected
    oh that sounds very positive, and reassuring. i do use things here but everyday things that are already in place grab rails on bath or towel rail etc but there are times i end up in a heap so i probably could use some help. yes thats the thing it can make things a bit safer limit those moments. thankyou TK
  • felixfelix Posts: 28Member Connected
    Hi @steve84,

    Like @topkitten said, it can be random things that you may not realise will be of benefit to you.

    For instance, I also have a toilet surround thing to hold onto, lever taps so I don't hurt my hands turning them on and off, grab rails at front door, perching stool, chair in shower etc. 

    The OT are there to help, and the assessment is not judging you in any way, like sometimes other assessments feel like! 

    Do please let us know how you get on, and how you found the process with regard's your anxiety. I'm sure it will be of great help to others in the future :)

    felix xx 

    felix xx
  • Jean_OTJean_OT Posts: 532Member Pioneering

    Hi @stevek84

    I'm just wondering have you now been able to clarify the reason the OT is going to visit? or maybe you have already had the appointment?

    Reading through this thread I can see that some other members of the community have already given you some good examples of some of the ways that OT's can assist.

    However, occupational therapy is a much more diverse  than this thread has thus far suggested. OT's have lots of different roles in the Health and Social Care sector and beyond. They may be based in statutory services or work for other organisations. Here are a few examples:

    • OT's can be involved in designing and delivering therapeutic programmes for a wide range of physical and mental conditions. This article illustrates OT's working with people who experience anxiety https://ot-magazine.co.uk/occupational-therapy-and-anxiety/ This sort of support is often assessed via a GP referral to the mental health team.

      OT's may be involved with assessing peoples home or work environments to see if adaptation, the addition of equipment or changes to how activities are structured or performed may enable the person to better be able to achieve those things they want/need to do. 

      OT's may work as part of multi-disciplinary teams assessing peoples care needs and compiling care plans.

      Some OT's are amongst the different sorts of health professionals that have been recruited by companies working on behalf of the DWP to carry out assessments for benefits.

      You might also encounter OT's, who like myself work for voluntary or charitable organisation. There are also OT's in the private sector working for a range of companies (such as equipment designers/retailers or clinical negligence law firms), or as independent practitioners.  


    All OT's working in the UK are registered with the HCPC and have to abide by the professions 'Standards of Proficiency'
     http://hpc-uk.org/assets/documents/10000512Standards_of_Proficiency_Occupational_Therapists.pdf

    If you are ever unclear as to the reason an OT is due to visit you please do contact them to ask for clarification, they should be more than happy to explain and be able to give you an outline of what to expect.

    Best Wishes

    Jean



    Jean Merrilees BSc MRCOT

    You can read more of my posts at: https://community.scope.org.uk/categories/ask-an-occupational-therapist

  • stevek84stevek84 Posts: 24Member Connected
    Hello sorry im not doing well ans that was a bit confusing for me, i have recently been told i had care needs assessment but wasnt told i was having  it nor was my advocwte present and many 8f the questions that appear were not asked, im not sure if this was an OT or if ive had one or due to have one but it has been mentioned its all cwry confusing for me and i dont know what to do with it all i have been shut in very little hujan contact in over ten years and been abused over thay time by the person i oived with abuse goes back nearky 30nyears total. There is so much going on i am swamped and have no way to acdess help i have tried realy hard but ita just nit happenimg im not getting nywhwremand my health is getting worse due to stress i was in a better place when i was being abused. Thnakyiu for your response and trying to help but im strugglong to get my head round it all. Sorry 

  • Jean_OTJean_OT Posts: 532Member Pioneering

    Hi @stevek84

    No need to apologise, I was just trying to illustrate some of the many ways that OT’s might be involved with providing services to people in general.

    However, it sounds as if what is important for you now is trying to sort out what is going on with your care needs assessment and, if necessary, challenging how it took place and the conclusions that were reached.

    You mentioned that you have an advocate are they able to assist you with this?

    If you can’t get advice locally then you might want to contact the Social Care Specialist at the Scope Helpline. Her name is Zoe. You can contact Zoe by emailing [email protected] or calling the freephone Helpline number 0808 800 3333 (open 9am to 5pm weekdays, closed weekends and bank holidays) and asking to be booked into one of Zoe’s telephone call-back appointments.

    Hope this is more helpful

    Jean

    Jean Merrilees BSc MRCOT

    You can read more of my posts at: https://community.scope.org.uk/categories/ask-an-occupational-therapist

  • stevek84stevek84 Posts: 24Member Connected
    Hello thanks, i meant no offence i appreciate your in depth response and helpful advice im just in such a mess too much to explain here but my heads so muddled up with so many things forms numbers people asesments etc its just not going in. Yes it was performed by a amp i think like a mental health social worker so not sure shes correct person to perfrom csre needs ass, and my advocate was supposed to be presnt but wasnt he expressly asked them to inform him and make it so they could arrive together yet they neglected to tell him and didnt inform me it was an assessment im not so worried about that kind of het the point of that like a health n safety inspector etc but many of the questions/answeres on the form where incorrect and some never even asked or untrue, eg she said i can walk up n down stairs fine when they brought my post up stsirs to me at end of meeting to save me a trip down as i struggle yet in form said different more like that and on some wuestions its almost as if shes guessed as i was never asked them? Fhe form where it says advocate presnet shes left it blank no YES or No box ticked? So not quite sure whats going on. My advocate isnt like a proper advocate and is already streetching his role its the isle of wight there is no proper advocscy service like mind.org etc.

    I think i have spoken to zoe end of last yesr so much going on im not sure abput whst or the outcome? Im so lost. Its too much sorry i appreciate your help and welcome any help but im just finding it hard to process or digest it all or make sense of any of it too much buzzing round in my head its overwhwlming and i got my ownmissues physical mental goimg on im not sure what to do. I knwo i need help and i dont have it and cant get it. 
  • Jean_OTJean_OT Posts: 532Member Pioneering

    Hi @stevek84

    I'm going to tag @Zoe_Scope into this conversation to see if there is anything she can suggest.

    Best Wishes

    Jean 

    Jean Merrilees BSc MRCOT

    You can read more of my posts at: https://community.scope.org.uk/categories/ask-an-occupational-therapist

  • stevek84stevek84 Posts: 24Member Connected
    Thanks jean-scope thats much appreciated, 

    Thanks again jean for being so understanding and supportive. 

    Steve 
  • [Deleted User][Deleted User] Posts: 0 Courageous

    Hello Steve,

    Yes we spoke last year and I provided you with information about local support services which I believe you are now in touch with.

    An approved mental health professional (AMHP) is responsible for organising and coordinating assessments under the Mental Health Act. The role of an AMHP is often held by specially trained social workers, but can also be carried out by occupational therapists, community mental health nurses and psychologists which is where the confusion about an OT assessment may have happened.

    The Mental Health Act (1983) is the main piece of legislation that covers the assessment, treatment and rights of people with a mental health disorder

    The professionals carrying out the assessment consider hospital admission and community based options that might help you, such as support and treatment in your home. The assessors role is to consider all the options and listen to your opinions.

    The role of the Approved Mental Health Professional in the assessment process is to give a non-medical view about your situation. This might include looking at social aspects of your life such as your living situation, what support you have and whether you're looking after yourself properly.

    All professionals involved in assessing you should keep you fully informed of what is happening. They should answer any specific questions you have. You have the right to ask them exactly why they are assessing you and what concerns they have about you.

    You can make a complaint about the fact your request for an advocate be present at the assessment was ignored, you could ask your advocate to help with this.

    Please see NHS Choices easy read factsheet that explains your rights https://www.nhs.uk/NHSEngland/AboutNHSservices/mental-health-services-explained/Pages/easy-read-mental-health-act.aspx

    I understand my colleague Debbie at the helpline is also providing advice to you about your housing situation.

    You can email me at [email protected] if you would like further information about your rights and support available in your local area.

    Best Wishes,

    Zoe

  • stevek84stevek84 Posts: 24Member Connected
    Hello zoe thanks for thst however as ive mentioned this was not the case my experience was far from that whst you wrote no wuestions asked thst appear on from almost as if shes filled in on guess work and not informed it was one and advocste nit present despite him insisting prior and onnthe form yes or no box for advocate presence, left both blank. my advocate did contact the assessor about it and had a bit of a go but she has said she wants my advocate to visit and ask me whats wrong with it? I provided in depth email explaining with comments or questions and my concerns for each question on the asesment at the time of complaint (before xmas i sent it to advocste he forwarded it on and asked for reassment) but she still wants him visit and ask me whats wrong with it? I would of thought written word was better? 


    Thanks steve
Sign in or join us to comment.