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Sleep struggles

S_a_r_a_hS_a_r_a_h Member Posts: 6 Listener
edited May 2018 in Parents and carers
Hi. My son is about to turn 3, has GDD, possible ASD, SPD and rarely sleep through the night. I have no problems getting him to sleep, though he won't fall asleep until around 8.30-9pm then will wake up at any time between 11pm & 5am - usually just once,  but he will be awake for about 2 hours. Then he's up & ready for the day by 7am. The lack of sleep is having a massive impact on me & my ability to work. We have a routine of bath, book & bed in the evenings, which is fine. There seems to be no obvious pattern to when he wakes in the night, but whatever time he wakes, he is ok on his own for a bit then will cry for me - he is unable to entertain himself really. Not for long anyway. The more he cries, or the more he calls out for me and I don't go into his room, he will stick his fingers down his throat & make himself sick! Which I have allowed him to do a number of times. Does anyone have any advice on anything i could try when he wakes up to encourage him to sleep through? Or at least not call out for me. 
Thanks

Replies

  • debbiedo49debbiedo49 Member Posts: 2,906 Disability Gamechanger
    What help are you getting with your child? Good luck Debbie 
    💜🏴󠁧󠁢󠁳󠁣󠁴󠁿
    I am a fibro warrior !💜♏️
  • JennysDadJennysDad Member Posts: 2,308 Pioneering
    Hello @S_a_r_a_h and a warm welcome to the community. I am absolutely certain that there will be mums (and dads) on here who will be able to relate directly to your experience.
    I have found a Scope resource 'Sleep tips for disabled children'. Perhaps you could have a look at it and get back to us.
    There is also a conversation here which might be of particular interest to you.
    Could you have a look at these and get back to me? If you put @JennysDad into your post it will ensure that I see it and can respond.
    Very glad to have you with us, Sarah,
    Warmest best wishes to you,
    Richard
  • Sam_ScopeSam_Scope Member Posts: 7,732 Disability Gamechanger
    Sleep Solutions provide support for families of disabled children that are having problems sleeping. This is for Children between the ages of two and 19.
    Read more at https://www.scope.org.uk/support/services/sleep-solutions#AEA0pwJD0b5mhxA7.99
    Scope
    Senior online community officer
  • S_a_r_a_hS_a_r_a_h Member Posts: 6 Listener
    What help are you getting with your child? Good luck Debbie 
    Hi Debbie - his paediatrician has offered to prescribe melatonin if his developmental paediatrician cannot help - his paediatrician said she would refer me to scope! So in terms of sleep - no help yet other than the responses here & my own research
  • S_a_r_a_hS_a_r_a_h Member Posts: 6 Listener
    JennysDad said:
    Hello @S_a_r_a_h and a warm welcome to the community. I am absolutely certain that there will be mums (and dads) on here who will be able to relate directly to your experience.
    I have found a Scope resource 'Sleep tips for disabled children'. Perhaps you could have a look at it and get back to us.
    There is also a conversation here which might be of particular interest to you.
    Could you have a look at these and get back to me? If you put @JennysDad into your post it will ensure that I see it and can respond.
    Very glad to have you with us, Sarah,
    Warmest best wishes to you,
    Richard
    Hi @JennysDad - thank you for the welcome and for the links. I decorated his room last year - black out blinds, nothing on the walls so as little simulation as possible, from 7.30pm we have quiet time - routine includes time in his sensory room, warm bath, book then bed. Going to sleep is no problem, it's the waking in the night. I can't see anything on that list that I haven't thought of but maybe I'm thinking of them in the wrong way! 
  • S_a_r_a_hS_a_r_a_h Member Posts: 6 Listener
    Sam_Scope said:
    Sleep Solutions provide support for families of disabled children that are having problems sleeping. This is for Children between the ages of two and 19.
    Read more at https://www.scope.org.uk/support/services/sleep-solutions#AEA0pwJD0b5mhxA7.99
    Thanks for your reply. I've already tried this and there is nothing within 20 miles of where I live. The only other option I discussed with the lovely lady in the phone is if I can tie in a visit to family in Merseyside to access support up there. So could maybe do that later in the year 
  • Sam_ScopeSam_Scope Member Posts: 7,732 Disability Gamechanger
    Oh that is a shame :( Have you spoken to your Health Visitor?
    Scope
    Senior online community officer
  • S_a_r_a_hS_a_r_a_h Member Posts: 6 Listener
    edited May 2018
    Yes, have spoken to our health visitor as well as 4 of her  lovely colleagues. They are full of advice  that they were keen to share but unfortunately it was all the 'obvious' things that I had already thought of myself. There was no 'specialist' advice from them. I'm thinking of trying the melatonin until I can get to a workshop or get someone round. I am going to a Kidz to Adultz exhibition next week where i think there is a talk on sleep so hoping to hear something I've not heard of or find a local specialist who can help. Fingers crossed!
  • debbiedo49debbiedo49 Member Posts: 2,906 Disability Gamechanger
    Good luck
    💜🏴󠁧󠁢󠁳󠁣󠁴󠁿
    I am a fibro warrior !💜♏️
  • S_a_r_a_hS_a_r_a_h Member Posts: 6 Listener
  • JennysDadJennysDad Member Posts: 2,308 Pioneering
    edited May 2018
    Hello again @S_a_r_a_h and thank you for getting back to me. I only wish I could do more.
    I don't suppose there is anything that could be set up to provide some focus for him when he is awake? Something like a sound-activated audio or video? I know I'm grasping at straws and it could be absolutely the worst thing - but if so I have no doubt others here would say so :smile:
    My own little girl would not sleep unless she slept with me, her head resting on my arm, and her immobility meant I spent a lot of time awake either trying to settle her or to ease the dead arm sensation I got several times a night. Sleep is such a big issue, I know.
    Warmest best wishes to you,
    Richard
    @JennysDad
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