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What are your Consumer Experiences?

Max_BellMax_Bell Posts: 14Member Connected

Hi everyone!

We at Scope know that disabled people can face lots of barriers when consumers, and we think it’s important to campaign on it, so that businesses and the government work to remove these barriers.

What are your experiences as a disabled consumer? The government are running a ‘Modernising Consumer Markets’ consultation, and we want to make sure that disabled people are at the heart of the government’s next steps.

We’d love to hear your stories and ideas in the comments below! Your responses will help inform our formal response to the government.

You can also read our blog to find out more about Scope’s work on consumer issues.

If you want to talk about this in more detail, you can also e-mail me at [email protected]

Thank you,

Max at Scope.

Replies

  • feirfeir Posts: 358Member Pioneering
    edited June 2018
    Ebay. China.
    Job done.
    As society gets 'lazier'*/has less free time/poorer, they find ways to cope, this is highly beneficial to disabled people.

    *Lazier will be the wrong word, less mobile, less outgoing, more introvert and people avoidant.
  • GainaGaina Posts: 133Member Pioneering
    The main problem I have when shopping on the highstreet is the card readers at the till: some are cordless, some have long leads and sometimes the staff don't even know how to get them off the cradle! 
  • Apri54Apri54 Posts: 8Member Listener
    Using a wheelchair or mobility scooter in the main big supermarkets I found that I could only shop from the middle shelf! And once I had my shopping in my basket found I couldn't get it on to the conveyer belt !
    Using a walking frame or sticks and a little trolley I could only shop from the top shelves! I fond that I couldn't lift the shopping back up from the self-service tills and I also struggle to pay If the card terminal is not on a long cord. That said if I ask for help I find staff go above and beyond, but I find it demoralising to ask some days. And I know big stores deliver great if I need anything  stocked on the bottom shelf ! But, unfortunately sometimes the budget won't stretch to big stores.
  • mikehughescqmikehughescq Posts: 3,583Member - under moderation Disability Gamechanger
    Access to shops and public buildings as a person with a sight impairment can be a depressing experience. Glass windows with inadequate signage so you don’t realise they’re there (Hello Apple Store I am talking to you). Carousels of no doubt attractive and essential things people want placed in entrances for maximum obstruction value. Steps with nosings that either never existed or have rubbed off. Accessible toilets that require you to find a member of staff and then let granny and grandkids go ahead of you and your stoma bag. Accessible toilets in comically inaccessible places (Hello railway stations. Yes, you). 

    Roped off queuing areas you can’t see until you take the rope and half the queue with you. Reflections from cash point screens. Tills where I’d like to read the cost on the screen but it’s too small or too far away. Wireless payment machines with similar issues. Prices on products that even people with perfect vision are squinting at. Products with packaging so similar you buy the wrong thing. Aisle labelling designed for absolutely nobody bar long-sighted giraffes. Staff with zero disability awareness training. Security staff in charge of accessible toilets etc. with less than zero of the same.

    Those fantastic places where staff see a cane; assume you’re wholly blind, and who then try to rip you off (`Hello Costa Coffee and your one size down abc watered down hot chocolate drink). Members of the public who assume the same and that you won’t see them queue jump.
  • ZeezeeZeezee Posts: 80Member Pioneering
    That one step that shops assume you can magically levitate your childs electric wheelchair over. I end up taking my daughter in her manual chair as I can get that up one or two steps but it is taking her independence from her every time I say"I am sorry sweetheart but you have to go in your manual today because whizzy can't get into the shops we are going to today" and it breaks my heart every time I have to say it.
  • GainaGaina Posts: 133Member Pioneering
    Zeezee said:
    That one step that shops assume you can magically levitate your childs electric wheelchair over. I end up taking my daughter in her manual chair as I can get that up one or two steps but it is taking her independence from her every time I say"I am sorry sweetheart but you have to go in your manual today because whizzy can't get into the shops we are going to today" and it breaks my heart every time I have to say it.
    There was a 'NEXT' in my local town that had a step, but they kept a lightweight ramp behind the counter and a notice on the window letting people know it was available if they needed it.  That is 'reasonable adjustment' and the shop you're talking about should be complying with it!
  • mikehughescqmikehughescq Posts: 3,583Member - under moderation Disability Gamechanger
    So how does one alert the person behind the counter I wonder? It’s barely a reasonable adjustment.
  • GainaGaina Posts: 133Member Pioneering
    edited July 2018
    So how does one alert the person behind the counter I wonder? It’s barely a reasonable adjustment.

    This particular shop assumes that you're with someone, which I agree is not ideal but at least they're trying. Others have a square pad you can hit to call for assistance. The small shopping mall in the nearest town to me has one and I think Boots does too.
  • tharathara Posts: 49Member - under moderation Courageous
    My son has a physical disability. We often go grocery shopping as a family and I do use a blue badge spot frequently as it makes more sense. I’ve had people question why I park there. Well I’m trying to keep my typical daughter safe and get my son out of there safely too. When my partner comes along I feel more comfortable and able to handle any issues. 
  • StagecoachStagecoach Posts: 11Member Connected
    Tried to get a walk in shower quote today from a disability bathroom specialist but was not intrested in what I required instead informed me that I and my sister who also acts as my carer would need to spare between 3 to 4 hrs for a presentation before he could do a quote . Told him 2 times that brochure clearly states no obligation quote but again ignored me ,, I don't know if I can name company on here but I would gladly provide it to anybody who requires it so to avoid this relevant disability bathing specialist .
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