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The way forward - for me, for now

Ok, despite a few people telling me DWP think disabled people can't ride motorcycle, I've had my test ride and bought the one I was looking at. I need to find a way to secure my walking stick(s) on it, maybe some thin drainpipe.
It'll keep me mobile locally while I appeal my PiP decision - as for DWP, disabled people can do a lot of things they may think impossible.
I recently heard of a lady, paralysed from the shoulders down, did 27 laps of the Isle of Man TT. She had hand controls and her feet gaffer taped to the footrests.
Seems to me, telling disabled people that they can't do something spurs many of them on to prove they can. 
I note it's sports this week, I'm sure there will be many posts by people still pursuing their chosen sports, and good luck to them.
IanT

Replies

  • TopkittenTopkitten Posts: 943Member Pioneering
    I really miss riding a motorbike. I used to use one to commute 60 odd miles to work each day for 5 years and loved almost every minute of it. Sadly now I cannot manage one as I could never lift it if it fell over or if I had an accident. However, despite great difficulties in walking and being housebound I am still quite capable of driving a car although at some point I may need to use hand controls only, If I lived in appropriate accommodation I would be able to resume driving so long as I can use a scooter to get to and from it. This unnecessary loss of ability could have been avoided if only the doctor would listen me instead of turning guidelines into rules. I hate to think what the assessors would make of it but, until I move into more appropriate accommodation, for now it is irrelevant.

    TK
    "I'm on the wrong side of heaven and the righteous side of hell" - from Wrong side of heaven by Five Finger Death Punch.
  • Grumpy1954Grumpy1954 Posts: 42Member Courageous
    I know what you mean about lifting one, I once came off on an oil deposit on a wet road, leg stuck on footrest/kickstart, had to get a passer by to lift it off me (750-4)
    This one is a little lighter, but I'd still struggle lifting it from floor. Luckily it has huge frame bump stops fitted to stave off damage.
  • TopkittenTopkitten Posts: 943Member Pioneering
    My last bike was a Bandit 600 which was heavy but fortunately never went over. Before that I had a Kawasaki 636 which I went over on twice because my weight was too much for the light bike. Before that I had a Phaser 600 which I had to pick up 4 times, always because I did something stupid, like trying to drive off with a wheel-lock still fitted, lol! I couldn't ride any of those now and the only type I could even consider would be an easy rider style. I did see a 125 version of that once but didn't dare think seriously about it as I suffer a progressive condition.

    TK
    "I'm on the wrong side of heaven and the righteous side of hell" - from Wrong side of heaven by Five Finger Death Punch.
  • Grumpy1954Grumpy1954 Posts: 42Member Courageous
    Shame, I missed bikes almost from when the last one (Honda 400-4) went. That replaced a Honda 750-4, which replace a Honda 250 twin.
    Started on a BSA Bantam 175cc, great fun.
  • YadnadYadnad Posts: 2,862Member - under moderation Disability Gamechanger
    Shame, I missed bikes almost from when the last one (Honda 400-4) went. That replaced a Honda 750-4, which replace a Honda 250 twin.
    Started on a BSA Bantam 175cc, great fun.
    And before that it was a Bantam 125 with saddle seat and steal leg protectors - ex GPO messenger bike!
  • Grumpy1954Grumpy1954 Posts: 42Member Courageous
    There were a lot of those ex GPO bikes around South London when I started, always trying to race from the traffic lights. They had 2 problems, mine was 50cc bigger, and my dad was an ex RAF engine fitter, first thing he did was take the engine out onto my mum's kitchen table, polish and smooth the inside and ports as much as they'd take.
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