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To the NHS staff who have cared for me

laurahc__laurahc__ Posts: 35Member Whisperer
edited July 5 in Guest blogs

My name is Laura and I blog over on Confessions of a Zebra. A few years ago, I was diagnosed with Ehlers-Danlos Sydrome and fibromyalgia and this year I received a diagnosis of gastroparesis. Having had to give up full time work, I am now passionate about raising awareness for rare diseases and trying to reduce stigma faced when you’re ill.

On the 5th July 2018, the NHS will be turning seventy years old: that’s seventy years of providing lifesaving healthcare to an ever-growing British population.

As someone with numerous chronic and long-term illnesses, I am incredibly grateful for the NHS. I’m not sure where I would be without it - probably in spiralling debt. There are, undoubtedly, criticisms regarding the NHS, but this is not down to the 1.3 million people who work for it: more down to the current state of politics, but this is not the time to talk politics and policies.

two arms taken from above one is taking a blood pressure reading from the other

So many of the people who work for the NHS go unnoticed and without thanks. They work tirelessly to keep the British population healthy. Regardless of health or wealth, we can be reassured that if we fall ill or have an accident, we will receive the treatment that we need.

NHS staff see the best and worst of people. They welcome babies in the world, sharing the joy with new parents and they administer end of life care, ensuring that people die with dignity and that the families are supported, during a time of grief, upheaval and turmoil. They are often dealing with people who are going through trauma and they do their best to relieve some of the pain and anxiety, felt by those needing medical care, as well as the people around them.

Needing medical care isn’t an alien experience for me. In fact, it’s the opposite, thanks to the fact that I am diagnosed with various long term medical conditions. But although I’m more familiar with the inside of my local A&E department and other departments in near-by hospitals, compared to most people my age, the familiarity doesn’t change the fact that it is still a frightening experience. But I can honestly say that I remember every single nurse who has looked after me on those occasions and ensured that I felt as safe and as calm as possible. This is not an easy task when you are overworked, underpaid and often unappreciated.

I can remember the nurse who held my hand during a particularly bad night, during one hospital admission. I was crying in pain, with pain relief not even beginning to lessen it. This one particular nurse sat with me until I was calm and we talked about my life, hopes and ambitions and things that I enjoyed. She told me that she had moved to England from Brazil because she was so desperate to work for the NHS.

I can remember the nurses and occasional therapists who went out of their way to ensure that I was at ease prior to me having surgery at the age of eight. They made me laugh and brought Guinea pigs into my room, as part of animal therapy. They also reassured me post-surgery when I was afraid and wanted my mum.

I can remember the health care assistant who apologised repeatedly when she had to cut me out of a Crew Clothing jumper, when I was on a spinal board, and then suggested that I wore cheaper clothes next time I ended up on a spinal board with a suspected fractured neck and bad concussion. Thankfully there hasn’t been a “next time”, but the joking eased the fear.

It’s not just nurses who make the NHS as good as it is. There are so many people who do their job every single day and remain pretty much unnoticed. There are the porters walking miles every single day, making sure patients are where they need to be; from experience porters are some of the kindest and funniest people I’ve ever met. True NHS heroes.

I can’t write about the NHS without mentioning GPs, in particular, my own very wonderful GP. My GP has been my biggest supporter for over ten years. She has fought a near-constant battle for me to receive the correct treatment for my various conditions and has never once given up on me, even when I have very much given up on myself. When you are diagnosed with a rare condition, one of the biggest hurdles faced is the lack of understanding from medical professionals. Yet my GP knows my body as well as I do and has gone out of her way to research and find out more about my conditions, so that she is able to treat me in the best possible way.

So, I’d like to take this opportunity to thank everyone who works for the NHS. Thank you for caring.

Can you relate to Laura's experiences? Let us know in the comments below!

confessionsofazebra.blog 

Replies

  • SallyMartinSallyMartin Posts: 12Member Whisperer
    Yes, yes, yes! I well support the NHS, nurses and doctors alike! I was diagnosed with multiple sclerosis 5 years ago, spent nearly 4 months in hospital. Came out in a wheelchair, then a stick, but no more! In fact I recently ran, walked and wheelchaired a local half marathon for the charity m.s. research, but I will never forget who helped me when I was hospital bound! XXX

  • SethLaaSethLaa Posts: 83Member Talkative
    I spent 3 weeks in Hammersmith Hospital in July of last year having Stem Cell and Chemo 'Therapy', I really did enjoy myself as the Specialists,physiotherapists and catering team were brilliant but got to give a bigger thanks to the nurses who cared for me, they truly did go 'above and beyond' the call of duty, even the other patients and visitors were extremely friendly and helpful, the NHS genuinely get a 10/10 from me, a massive thanks to one and all 
  • SethLaaSethLaa Posts: 83Member Talkative
    Yes, yes, yes! I well support the NHS, nurses and doctors alike! I was diagnosed with multiple sclerosis 5 years ago, spent nearly 4 months in hospital. Came out in a wheelchair, then a stick, but no more! In fact I recently ran, walked and wheelchaired a local half marathon for the charity m.s. research, but I will never forget who helped me when I was hospital bound! XXX

    Well done @SallyMartin' I too have MS but may only be able to manage a half marathon by car lol, take care xxx
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