Visual and hearing impairments
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Not getting on with in ear aids but are specs/audio alternatives viable?

newbornnewborn Member Posts: 541 Pioneering
Are microphoones in spectacle frames just as good?  Or nearly? 

Would it be possible to quickly turn off when assaulted by a skull rattling attack of muzac?
Has anyone ever successfully sued such an assailant of deaf and of mentally distressed people?


Replies

  • VickiKirwinVickiKirwin Member Posts: 69 Courageous
    Hi @newborn

    There is a really wide range of hearing aids available to suit most people although it's really very rare for anyone to opt for spectacle hearing aids these days. This leaflet 'Getting hearing aids' from Action on Hearing Loss explains the types commonly available through both the NHS and privately https://www.actiononhearingloss.org.uk/how-we-help/information-and-resources/publications/hearing-aids-and-cochlear-implants/ 

    But whatever model of hearing aid you wear it is important that it is programmed individually to the frequencies you need (your hearing loss), shape/size of ear, and dynamic range (the range of your hearing between the quietest sounds you can detect and the loudest sound you find comfortable). If your current hearing aids are making some sounds uncomfortable then have a chat with your audiologist about re-programming them to help remove these unpleasant sounds. They can also refer you for further support (such as a local support group, or a hearing therapist) to help you adjust to wearing hearing aids so that you get the maximum benefit from them. 

    Good luck and let us know how you get on.

    Vicki
  • newbornnewborn Member Posts: 541 Pioneering
    That is kind thank you Vicki.   In-ear  problem is, like others  on nearby threads, to do with having anything at all jammed in the ear, just as you wouldn't wear earplugs day in day out, only for half an hour a week swim perhaps.  Otherwise, you would find it uncomfortable and probably the wax hairs couldn't get on with their work so you soon have infection and or blockage pain.

    The intrusive noise situation is a discrimination issue.  Shops and cafes are sold muzac in the mistaken notion you, I,  and everyone must, must, be thrilled to have someone else's choice of sound blasted at you as a form of assault.  At last, many are removing the offending noise, after driving sensitive customers away.

    One disability minister  (Eagle?) actually  'got it', and took the initiative of placing an ad.  Declaring unwanted noise is an intrusion and assault, just as forced touch would be, and noting that it particularly impacts deaf people, she defined it a clear breach of the disability equality act.   (Probably it was one of the Eagle sister m.P's,  as one was a wheelie therefore two were disability aware))

      But pavement noise attackers are still doing their decibel shattering worst.   An audiologist might get the adjustment ok ish for most situations, but nobody can 'correct' for a dècibel equivalent of a jet plane at close range.

  • PinPin Member Posts: 132 Courageous
    I don’t think infection is an issue with hearing aids- I’ve had mine 9 years and am yet to have any ear infections as A result or at all. Speak to your audiologist and see what the smallest receiver you can get is, I don’t have full molds and find them much for comfortable. You can also ask for a setting to turn down background noise. Personally, if I pass a bagpiper (my own personal torture, similar to your dislike of music) I just switch them off.

    as an alternative, a lot of shops are now doing autism friendly hours which include having no music on. It might be worth looking into this, I know it’s not always convenient but you might find it more comfortable for you.
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