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Is assistive/disability equipment ugly?!

I would like to know your views on whether you find assistive/disability equipment pleasing or offensive to your eyes! How does it make you feel? Do you wish there were alternatives? 

I am studying at Cardiff University and undertaking Masters level research on this topic.

I am trying to find out whether the appearance of equipment or adaptations could have an effect on health and wellbeing.

If you are using or purchasing equipment on behalf of other people, or just have an interest in this topic personally or professionally, I would really like to hear from you.

If you are interested in participating, this research will be undertaken in the context of an online focus group. You will get a login to the site and all your details will remain confidential. You can contribute at your leisure as long as the group remains open, which will be for a period of about two months between October to December 2018.

If you would like to participate, you can get in contact with me - Emma Sheppard at [email protected]

I will send you a participant information sheet and if you are happy to continue, I will provide login details to the group.

Thanks, Emma  :)

Replies

  • Chloe_ScopeChloe_Scope Posts: 5,900Administrator Scope community team
    Hi @EmmaSheppard and a very warm welcome to the community! I hope you get the information and participation that you are after. I wish you the very best of luck with your studies :)
    Chloe
    Online Community Officer
  • wheelygirlwheelygirl Posts: 45Member Courageous
    Hey I am happy to help I am 24 years old with qud cerebralpasly
  • mikehughescqmikehughescq Posts: 3,506Member - under moderation Disability Gamechanger
    I suspect the issue has been defined too broadly. I have rejected some things which would undoubtedly help me because they are aesthetically displeasing but others may not have that luxury.
  • EmmaSheppardEmmaSheppard Posts: 7Member Listener
    Hey I am happy to help I am 24 years old with qud cerebralpasly
    Hello! thanks for getting back to me! Please can you send me an email to [email protected] and I will get in touch with you.  This is so that you don't have to put your email address on this website.  Looking forward to hearing from you. Emma. :)
  • EmmaSheppardEmmaSheppard Posts: 7Member Listener
    I suspect the issue has been defined too broadly. I have rejected some things which would undoubtedly help me because they are aesthetically displeasing but others may not have that luxury.

    Hi Mike,  I would really value your opinions on this. I agree the issue is broad, and there are a complex range of reasons why people accept or reject equipment. I believe that there should be a platform for discussion about this though.  If you would like to participate, please contact me at [email protected]  Best wishes, Emma 
  • wheelygirlwheelygirl Posts: 45Member Courageous
    Hey I am happy to help I am 24 years old with qud cerebralpasly
    Hello! thanks for getting back to me! Please can you send me an email to sheppard[email protected] and I will get in touch with you.  This is so that you don't have to put your email address on this website.  Looking forward to hearing from you. Emma. :)
    Hi I just sent you an email Georgia 😊
  • wheelygirlwheelygirl Posts: 45Member Courageous
    I have tried to email you but it will not send. Sorry
  • EmmaSheppardEmmaSheppard Posts: 7Member Listener
    Hi Georgia

    I'm really sorry, its [email protected]!
    Silly me.
    Thanks
  • EmmaSheppardEmmaSheppard Posts: 7Member Listener
    I would like to know your views on whether you find assistive/disability equipment pleasing or offensive to your eyes! How does it make you feel? Do you wish there were alternatives? 

    I am studying at Cardiff University and undertaking Masters level research on this topic.

    I am trying to find out whether the appearance of equipment or adaptations could have an effect on health and wellbeing.

    If you are using or purchasing equipment on behalf of other people, or just have an interest in this topic personally or professionally, I would really like to hear from you.

    If you are interested in participating, this research will be undertaken in the context of an online focus group. You will get a login to the site and all your details will remain confidential. You can contribute at your leisure as long as the group remains open, which will be for a period of about two months between October to December 2018.

    If you would like to participate, you can get in contact with me - Emma Sheppard at [email protected]

    I will send you a participant information sheet and if you are happy to continue, I will provide login details to the group.

    Thanks, Emma  :)
    PLEASE NOTE INCORRECT EMAIL ADDRESS ABOVE: correct email is [email protected], thanks
  • newbornnewborn Posts: 328Member Pioneering
    I think ouch or another site put a bar on students getting their work done for them!  Yes, of course, the astounding clunky ugliness would put anyone off. It also makes the home distressing for fellow occupants and visitors.

    S.S. assessors also attempt to force commodes onto people, so as to refuse them more frequent visits to assist in and out of the bathroom.   On the latter point, even back pack hostels in Japan have all singing all dancing loos, which make costly uk cl*s*m*t closets look primitive.  Because they are standard fit in Japan's building industry, there are economies of scale, so it is affordable for every home to have an automated washing drying loo, so any future resident or visitor will not need humiliating assistance.

    The unfortunates who submit to council installed grab rails etc. are punished by having a home rendered hideous.

    Now, if you want to do something useful,cooperate with the art/design/engineering/etc people on campus.  Just photos of a simple before and after computer mock up would suffice.   Grab rails, for example, could be disguised as towel rails, and wash basin surrounds,  within bathroom redesign.  Wet rooms could be the default in new build.   

    Wide doors too, and windows to the floor, opening, with at least juliette,  but normally a balcony suited to at least a minimal garden for any future housebound occupant (and to maximise the air cleaning power of plants),  and space on the circuit board for tracer hoists, and standard design could include a norm of designing a path for track or for Bariatric Width Chair, from bed to bath etc. . 

    Also loo cages  won't be necessary, nor will repulsive toilet seat raisers, if standard seats are installed higher, or, if retrofit must be done, then let a plumber simply raise the pan on a pedestal.  Or, use wall hang pans, which are easy to clean under. (That's if there is still no default assumption of the wash dry Japanese loos)
    .
    The raised height thing is a bugbear.  All public spaces should have a range of seat heights.  All home furniture should be available with choice of legs, or adjustments built in.  People shouldn't need revolting add on feet for chairs, nor should they struggle to get up, nor should they, in most cases, have the slightest need for paying a fortune for a repellant ugly tip out chair.
  • EmmaSheppardEmmaSheppard Posts: 7Member Listener
    edited August 2018
    Hi Newborn, Thanks so much for your comments. I would be so grateful if you would be able to contact me on the above email address, as I cannot include the comments here as part of the research, I am using this forum to advertise it only as I have to comply with the university ethics recommendations.  I really do hope that you get in touch, the email address is [email protected], best wishes, Emma 
  • EmmaSheppardEmmaSheppard Posts: 7Member Listener
    newborn said:
    I think ouch or another site put a bar on students getting their work done for them!  Yes, of course, the astounding clunky ugliness would put anyone off. It also makes the home distressing for fellow occupants and visitors.

    S.S. assessors also attempt to force commodes onto people, so as to refuse them more frequent visits to assist in and out of the bathroom.   On the latter point, even back pack hostels in Japan have all singing all dancing loos, which make costly uk cl*s*m*t closets look primitive.  Because they are standard fit in Japan's building industry, there are economies of scale, so it is affordable for every home to have an automated washing drying loo, so any future resident or visitor will not need humiliating assistance.

    The unfortunates who submit to council installed grab rails etc. are punished by having a home rendered hideous.

    Now, if you want to do something useful,cooperate with the art/design/engineering/etc people on campus.  Just photos of a simple before and after computer mock up would suffice.   Grab rails, for example, could be disguised as towel rails, and wash basin surrounds,  within bathroom redesign.  Wet rooms could be the default in new build.   

    Wide doors too, and windows to the floor, opening, with at least juliette,  but normally a balcony suited to at least a minimal garden for any future housebound occupant (and to maximise the air cleaning power of plants),  and space on the circuit board for tracer hoists, and standard design could include a norm of designing a path for track or for Bariatric Width Chair, from bed to bath etc. . 

    Also loo cages  won't be necessary, nor will repulsive toilet seat raisers, if standard seats are installed higher, or, if retrofit must be done, then let a plumber simply raise the pan on a pedestal.  Or, use wall hang pans, which are easy to clean under. (That's if there is still no default assumption of the wash dry Japanese loos)
    .
    The raised height thing is a bugbear.  All public spaces should have a range of seat heights.  All home furniture should be available with choice of legs, or adjustments built in.  People shouldn't need revolting add on feet for chairs, nor should they struggle to get up, nor should they, in most cases, have the slightest need for paying a fortune for a repellant ugly tip out chair.
    Hi Newborn, Thanks so much for your comments. I would be so grateful if you would be able to contact me on the above email address, as I cannot include the comments here as part of the research, I am using this forum to advertise it only as I have to comply with the university ethics recommendations.  I really do hope that you get in touch, the email address is [email protected], best wishes, Emma 
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