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Possibility of APD

Ami2301Ami2301 Posts: 3,869Member, Community champion Brian Blessed
For nearly 2 years I have been learning to accept that I am deaf. In the last day or two I have discovered I might have APD which is Auditory Processing Disorder.

It means that the person is not deaf but has difficulty in understanding some words, simple sentences and complex sentences.

I have just seen my Speech and Language Therapist and she thinks there is a possibility that I have APD and is gouging to ask for an audiologists opinion. She done a little assessment with me, I was OK with one-words but struggled with ‘Double’ and ‘Trouble’ Then we tried sentences and I had to ask her to repeat herself on one, then another it just sounded like 4 words morphed into one and i couldn’t understand.

Now I just feel confused and lost...has anyone else had any experience of APD?
You're a fighter. Look at everything you've overcome. Don't give up now!

Replies

  • Pippa_ScopePippa_Scope Posts: 5,858Member Brian Blessed
    Oh wow! That must have been a shock, how are you feeling about it @Ami2301?

    I found this past discussion where @androgen discusses ADP which may be helpful. Hopefully others will come forward and share their experiences too!
  • Ami2301Ami2301 Posts: 3,869Member, Community champion Brian Blessed
    I am just really confused @Pippa_Scope as this could potentially explain what happened last year. I had 2 suspected TIAs, a stroke can trigger APD.

    Thanks for the post, I will send them a message.
    You're a fighter. Look at everything you've overcome. Don't give up now!
  • AndrogenAndrogen Posts: 53Member Whisperer
    I was diagnosed fairly recently (this year actually) but when I was younger it was assumed I was deaf/hard of hearing

    You can actually get tested for it by a specialist audiologist (I had mine done by the Obscure Auditory Dysfunction team at the local hospital)
    They usually give you a questionnaire, test your normal hearing, and then do a series of tests with and without noise to see if you are able to hear normally, but also if you're estimating how well you can hear (so basically if you think you can hear it and you can't, or if you think you can't but you can)
    There isn't really much they can do about it unfortunately, but you'll get a letter for employers/schools if you need help with things because of it, and they may suggest specific things that will help for you
  • Ami2301Ami2301 Posts: 3,869Member, Community champion Brian Blessed
    Thanks @Androgen may I ask how you’ve been coping with it?
    You're a fighter. Look at everything you've overcome. Don't give up now!
  • AndrogenAndrogen Posts: 53Member Whisperer
    I try to lip read, my friends are quite good about looking at me when they talk, but other than that it's just trying to keep things quiet if possible
    Unfortunately we don't qualify for sign language support, but we're saving up for a course and learning signs online to use sign supported English, which is really useful (for me at least)
  • Ami2301Ami2301 Posts: 3,869Member, Community champion Brian Blessed
    I try to lip read too, but having central vision loss aswell makes it difficult but I really do try. It's good that you have a supportive network around you. I just wish people wouldn't laugh at me when I mispronounce words or I ask them to repeat themselves.

    Does your consultant know what caused your APD?

    I know a little bit of sign language, have you tried the British sign language website?
    You're a fighter. Look at everything you've overcome. Don't give up now!
  • AndrogenAndrogen Posts: 53Member Whisperer
    It seems like in my case I was born with it (I also have other brain issues, probably due to lack of oxygen at birth)

    We've looked online but all the courses are really expensive, we've found an online course fairly cheap for levels 1 & 2 of bsl, but tgere's also some BSL video dictionaries, so you can look up specific words and things that you need
  • GeoffBosworth195661GeoffBosworth195661 Posts: 158Member Chatterbox
    Hello, all deafness is that many items you can choose from. If you went deaf late on in life then it can be a number of things. Have you had a hospital appointment? If you have had you had a scan this then gives a better understanding from your hearing. In most cases we have most common others are more complicated  These sought are very rare, have you tried any aids if you have then don't be conned of sound quality as hearing aids they have from NHS are just as good. That is your decision. You also can have a day in the hospital and have inserts that go behind the ear with a very little cut to have implants. If you are deaf then they can also supply vibrating words so the brain acknowledges what you can hear. You have a small charge for this type but as many benefits. Talk it through when you see your GP for the next appointment to the NHS. Have a lovely afternoon.
  • Ami2301Ami2301 Posts: 3,869Member, Community champion Brian Blessed
    Hi @GeoffBosworth195661

    Thank you for your advice. I have been having regular hearing tests since May 2017. They have tried 2 hearing aids and an amplifier. Both only enhance the noise that I already hear. It has been extremely difficult to explain to everyone that I can hear but I just cannot understand what some people are saying. It's incredibly frustrating. 

    Words that sound similar and complex sentences I really struggle with, for example, yesterday someone asked me how I was getting on with my job application. I heard job as shop. 
    You're a fighter. Look at everything you've overcome. Don't give up now!
  • Ami2301Ami2301 Posts: 3,869Member, Community champion Brian Blessed
    @Androgen I use the BSL video dictionaries, they're really good!
    You're a fighter. Look at everything you've overcome. Don't give up now!
  • Pippa_ScopePippa_Scope Posts: 5,858Member Brian Blessed
    Thanks for sharing your experiences, @Androgen!
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