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What about educating the NHS

veritercveriterc Posts: 146Community champion Pioneering
There is a little word called SORRY. It can defuse a situation when you have done something stupid, and want to apologise;  when used, it can often make the person wronged feel better,  So what about the NHS learning this simple word? But NHS don't seem to know it - and don't use it, even when phoning you to say a long-awaited appointment is cancelled. To add insult to injury, yesterday I was told that this was happenning, but I couldn't re-arrange the appointment myself, I had to ask my GP to do this.
So the NHS considers I am too stupid to arrange my own appointments.  Am I the only one ?

Replies

  • Pippa_ScopePippa_Scope Posts: 5,858Member Disability Gamechanger
    Really sorry to hear this, @veriterc.
  • happy91happy91 Posts: 99Member Courageous
    @veriterc you are not alone. I had to self refer myself for occupational health after the doctor made an incorrect referral and kept pretending they had referred me when in fact they hadn't. Everyone makes mistakes, I wouldn't of minded if they'd said and then got on with it and for a period of a few months they pretended they had done it. I would rearrange everything you can do direct, direct. Anything with the GP make an appointment ASAP and get in ASAP to get it back on track. With waiting lists as they are you really would think everyone would be more honest and cooperative. No one wants to be at fault or have a potential law suit against them when really all we need is the right help.
  • happy91happy91 Posts: 99Member Courageous
    Chase them up all the time. Never let it lie.
  • veritercveriterc Posts: 146Community champion Pioneering
    I do agree - we all make mistakes (me constantly) but at least I say sorry!.  At least I know I am not alone, but Ithink this highlights the way the NHS 'nannies' us, they know best, and we are supposed not to be able to think for ourselves!   
  • happy91happy91 Posts: 99Member Courageous
    I think it is the difference between a private and public health system that creates this. The public system looks to save money and thinks this is the way. Not true. Providing good, accurate care and help will put the money to best use.
  • veritercveriterc Posts: 146Community champion Pioneering
    Isn't it a pity that there should be this massive chasm between private and NHS care?  You would think everyone would be working towards what was best care, rather than all the petty restrictions that crop up when we try and get the best care.  Thank goodness for this Forum - at least I know I am not alone!
  • exdvrexdvr Posts: 173Member Pioneering

    Hi @veriterc,

    When I was working it was company policy to never say sorry for anything no matter how trivial the issue was.  Their attitude was that saying sorry was an admission of guilt and they could be sued for damages.  Sadly yet another example of how American attitudes have taken over our lives.

    Best wishes.

    DLTBGYD

  • veritercveriterc Posts: 146Community champion Pioneering
    What I HATE is mentioning I would appreciate an apology - and being told by a Call Centre worker "well, I am saying sorry now."NO-that is not adequate;  the person in charge needs to apologise, and mean it. 
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