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PIP descriptors

worried33worried33 Posts: 78Member Whisperer
edited January 24 in PIP, DLA and AA
Does anyone have any opinion on the following.

I am putting in a claim for PIP as I need the money and believe I qualify.

However the only thing I Am confident I qualify for is low rate mobility (50m walking distance).

However the following do also apply to me.

I definitely have distress when going out using my stroller, as my age I feel like people are staring at me etc.  It's enough it often prevents me using it, which usually means not going out at all, as I understand it points can be awarded for this.

For daily living the following apply to me, but I believe this only gives me 4 points so no entitlement to anything.

I have an aid for going toilet.
An aid for using the bath.
In considerable pain washing my hair.
I can do basic cooking tasks without an aid like putting something in the oven or microwave, but anything that requires preparation like slicing cheese, hob type cooking and washing up dishes I need to use my stool for so I have something to sit on (an aid).
Occasionally but not all the time I also need to use an aid to help me dress and undress, I have a whats known as a grabber or reacher, which I use to help take socks on and off as well as trousers when on occasions I am unable to bend to do that action.  But it is not all the time.

I would appreciate thoughts, thanks.

Replies

  • maya605maya605 Posts: 16Member Listener
    Hi @worried33 and welcome. I’m new to all of this as well. The advice I would give you is base all your answers on your worst days. I wouldn’t put some days I can and some days I can’t. Don’t base it on good days. 
  • YadnadYadnad Posts: 2,839Member Brian Blessed
    maya605 said:
    Hi @worried33 and welcome. I’m new to all of this as well. The advice I would give you is base all your answers on your worst days. I wouldn’t put some days I can and some days I can’t. Don’t base it on good days. 
    Wrong! If a disability results in an impact and is matched to a descriptor And it is variable then that is what you should show.

    By claiming that the worst day is like that for every day and that it does not vary, than you are actually carrying out benefit fraud.
    Be truthful and say it as it is.
  • poppy123456poppy123456 Posts: 7,236Member, Community champion Brian Blessed
    edited January 23
    Sorry, but that's not great advice to base filling out the form on your worst day.  PIP isn't about your worst days. It's how you are 50% of the time based on a 12 month period.

    If someone fills out their form based on their worst day and when it comes to their face to face assessment they're having one of their good days then the HCP will immediately see through this and think "well if that's their bad day, they can't be as bad as they said they were"

    Always tell the truth and nothing more.
  • clpclp Posts: 39Member Whisperer
    Hi
    Just opened my brown envelope and have been awarded standard daily living and enhanced mobility.  I listed the drugs I was on and my conditions, both lengthy lists and for each question I answered honestly but gave gave examples eg to make a cup of coffee I fill kettle and sit down.  After a few mins I get cup and put coffee in it and turn kettle on again.  Then i sit down and eventually I add water to cup and carry to my chair.  I also said at work they make coffee for me as I can't stand long enough to wait for kettle to boil.  I had a home visit (not requested) and did not send any additional information.  They have awarded it for 6 years.  Now I know this is probably a once in a lifetime experience but I do feel that if you give detailed examples which are backed up by your physical movement etc then it gets better results then just concentrating on illness.  I work in a GP surgery and we are never approached by DWP for PIP awards which fits as all we can tell them is about your illness not it's impact.  No one person reacts in the same way to the same illness.  How I react to pain is different to 20 years ago then I hadnt experienced it but now I have so a 10 for me means pain bad enough to pass out.  Generally not most people's experience.  The process itself is long winded and almost designed to confuse so don't worry about that as it's the same for everyone and you can't change it.  Do your best completing the form and then know it's a long wait with confusing texts and letters saying the same thing and absolutely no clarity.   None of which is your fault or aimed at you it's just an awful system.  Good luck and I am sure you will get through it.
  • worried33worried33 Posts: 78Member Whisperer
    edited January 24
    Yes I have no intention of claiming bad days are an every day occurence.  As has been pointed out a f2f assessor would see through that.

    I just wanted some advise on how I should be reporting my problems and specifically what counts as needing aid to prepare food as its not clear in the descriptors.

    Poppy has partially answered with the 50% of the time criteria which I am grateful for.  I would say I dont need to use aids 50% of the time for undressing so that wont be emphasised.

    But I do need aids more than 50% of the time for hob cooking, preparation type cooking like slicing cheese and as well as washing up.  But I dont need it for very basic cooking, this is the bit I am still confused about, is the descriptor only for basic cooking tasks?
  • poppy123456poppy123456 Posts: 7,236Member, Community champion Brian Blessed
    The cooking and preparing a simple meal, means from fresh ingredients. A perching stool is an aid for cooking.

    This link, although very long, is well worth reading because it will give you a little more understanding of what the descriptors mean.

  • minniemoominniemoo Posts: 51Member Whisperer
    Hi @worried33 when completing the pip for I personally broke each section of the questions down and answered in detail onto A4 sheets with heading to each descriptor. I also kept a daily diary and sent a copy of a weekly account in with the pip form. Good Luck 😉 
  • YadnadYadnad Posts: 2,839Member Brian Blessed
    The cooking and preparing a simple meal, means from fresh ingredients. A perching stool is an aid for cooking.

    This link, although very long, is well worth reading because it will give you a little more understanding of what the descriptors mean.

    Just a side issue as regards cooking. I understand what they are asking for but I do really wonder how someone can answer the questions if they have never made a meal (of any size and type) in their life. Obviously I know what a carrot looks like and that you have to peel a potato (having seen it done many times). My wife has done all of the cooking and baking and before that my mother. Being just the two of us now, my wife does very little cooking and I, in the main, have ready meals for one from the supermarkets - M&S, Waitrose etc. - Simple meal from fresh ingredients, I would not know where to start.
     
  • poppy123456poppy123456 Posts: 7,236Member, Community champion Brian Blessed
    Not being able to cook or never having cooked doesn't count. What does count is can you cook a meal from scratch using fresh ingredients. This includes cutting/pealing veg, using pans safely, carrying the pans from the cooker etc. If you can't do any of this, why can't you do it and what would happen if you did try to do it.

    Same for all the other descriptors that apply. You say washing your hair causes you pain but can you wash it yourself? If you can, why can't you do? What happened the last time you attempted to do it yourself?

    You say you use an aid sometimes to dress and undress. How often do you use this aid and why do you use it? What happened the last time you attempt to dress and undress when you didn't use the aid?

    Going by what you said above, you won't score enough points for a daily living award. Are there any other descriptors that may apply to you? Have you looked at the link i posted above?

    You say you're distressed when you go out because of the aid you use. Do you go out alone or do you need someone with you when you do go out? If you need someone with you, what happened the last time you attempted or went out alone?

    These are all the things they will look at when assessing you. You need to give examples for each descriptor that applies.
  • YadnadYadnad Posts: 2,839Member Brian Blessed
    Not being able to cook or never having cooked doesn't count. What does count is can you cook a meal from scratch using fresh ingredients. This includes cutting/pealing veg, using pans safely, carrying the pans from the cooker etc. If you can't do any of this, why can't you do it and what would happen if you did try to do it. 
    If you have never cooked that question is hypothetical. It may well be the case that if they physically attempted to cook it would be a disaster. Does the descriptor suggest that for those who haven't a clue how to start cooking should try to?
     In a way that descriptor would only apply to those that know how to cook but have problems in doing so.
    Seems a tad unfair to me. Maybe if I did try I would be a natural chef or on the other hand put myself in hospital having sliced a finger off or dropped the pan of boiling water over my legs and feet. 
  • poppy123456poppy123456 Posts: 7,236Member, Community champion Brian Blessed
    Whether it would be a disaster or not, not being able to cook because you've never cooked isn't part of the criteria for that descriptor. Lets be honest, if this was taken into consideration there would a lot of people scoring points for this descriptor.
  • YadnadYadnad Posts: 2,839Member Brian Blessed
    Whether it would be a disaster or not, not being able to cook because you've never cooked isn't part of the criteria for that descriptor. Lets be honest, if this was taken into consideration there would a lot of people scoring points for this descriptor.
    I agree, it is a ridiculous descriptor if we go down that road.
    But it appears that only those claimants that know how to cook and have experience of doing so could ever get points under that heading.
    The mind boggles.

  • poppy123456poppy123456 Posts: 7,236Member, Community champion Brian Blessed
    I'm not even sure why your mind boggles on this one because it makes perfect sense to me. I have no idea why you think that those that don't know how to cook, could score points here.
  • cristobalcristobal Posts: 97Member Talkative
    I agree @poppy123456.....if you don't  cook (through choice, because you've never learned) and prefer to live of microwave meals then you will score nil points.

    Cooking is a basic skill which everyone can attempt to some degree. It's not like you're being asked whether you can ride a unicycle, or weave a Persian rug!
  • cristobalcristobal Posts: 97Member Talkative
    On a more serious note, I second @minniemoo 's comments about keeping a diary.

    My condition is variable. When I first applied for PIP, if you had asked me how often I could/ could not carry out a task I wouldn't  have know.

    I kept a diary for a couple of weeks which made filling out the form easier. Also, when I had my assessment I could confidently say, for example, that five or six days a week I couldn't do 'X'. The assessor seemed particularly keen to suggest "twice a week" as an alternative but I stuck to my guns....
  • worried33worried33 Posts: 78Member Whisperer
    edited January 24
    I will do the diary thanks for the advice.

    I looked at the descriptors, and do find them confusing but the engaging with other people I think I would score 2 or 4 points on that, I think more likely 2 tho.

    So 2 points bathing aid, 2 points cooking aid, 2 points toilet aid, 2 points engaging face to face with people.  I think this would be maximum, so if an assessor was awkward accepting any of these descriptors I wouldnt meet the criteria.

    Also I have booked an appointment with my GP to get evidence of all of the above.  The aid's will be visible to the assessor, but at the very least I want evidence from my GP for the engaging with people.
  • YadnadYadnad Posts: 2,839Member Brian Blessed

    cristobal said:
    I agree @poppy123456.....if you don't  cook (through choice, because you've never learned) and prefer to live of microwave meals then you will score nil points.

    Cooking is a basic skill which everyone can attempt to some degree. It's not like you're being asked whether you can ride a unicycle, or weave a Persian rug!

    It's not a choice, it's a fact that many people in this country can't cook for many reasons. One being that they have never been taught how to.
    Those of my generation (males born in the 1940's) see the household chores that mum then wife does the cooking.
    Personally I have never had the need to want to cook.
    Many couples of my daughters' age (38) have wonderful and expensive fitted kitchens but the hob and oven are as new as never been used. Couples today just use the microwave combi unit.

    Neither of my daughters' buy fresh ingredients preferring to use packaged meals and/or takeaways. Both are professionally qualified and work full time.  
     
    The descriptor will not change obviously but to me it appears to be biased only towards those that know/have some prior knowledge of how to cook a simple meal.

    I would add and finish on this note. My first wife back in the early 60's also had no idea how to prepare and cook anything. Her idea of a good meal consisted of prepared potatoes that came in a tin, and tinned peas with a chicken that had been cooked by the supermarket. The tins of potatoes and peas were warmed up still in their tins on the hob for a few minutes and served! She was far from uneducated in that she was a brilliant classical musician, composer and head of music at the local grammar school.
  • minniemoominniemoo Posts: 51Member Whisperer
    Thankyou @cristobal I was successful at my appeal only this week and it was defiantly my diaries that won my case as when you actually sit in front of the panel your mind goes blank (well mine did) you say to yourself if they ask me this il say that but honestly with my diary I could reflect back to the panel my exact good days and bad days and why I couldn’t prepare and cook a freshly made meal from starting to finishing the task also safely as well. Also after pointing out which was also reflected in my diary under the realibilty ctiteria I could not carry out the task safely to an acceptable standard repeatedly and in a reasonable time period yes I was asked how far I could walk? I referred them to my diary do you mean until I’m in pain, tired and could not repeat unless I had a reasonable time to rest in between. A diary is worth its weight in gold answers the majority of their questions 😊
  • minniemoominniemoo Posts: 51Member Whisperer
    worried33 said:
    I will do the diary thanks for the advice.

    I looked at the descriptors, and do find them confusing but the engaging with other people I think I would score 2 or 4 points on that, I think more likely 2 tho.

    So 2 points bathing aid, 2 points cooking aid, 2 points toilet aid, 2 points engaging face to face with people.  I think this would be maximum, so if an assessor was awkward accepting any of these descriptors I wouldnt meet the criteria.

    Also I have booked an appointment with my GP to get evidence of all of the above.  The aid's will be visible to the assessor, but at the very least I want evidence from my GP for the engaging with people.

  • minniemoominniemoo Posts: 51Member Whisperer
    Hi @worried33 just a little note they might ask you who issued your aids and when as people can purchase there own from a mobility shop so if they have been issued via physio etc; see if you can get evidence of this I had a walking aid assement at home so I sent in the letter with my info hope this helps x 
  • YadnadYadnad Posts: 2,839Member Brian Blessed
    You will probably have to demonstrate that all of these aids have been acquired for need and not for choice.
  • worried33worried33 Posts: 78Member Whisperer
    The aids were provided via a occupational therapist, I also have regular safety checks on the bath lift from the company, I will get proof of this, thanks for the warning.
  • minniemoominniemoo Posts: 51Member Whisperer
    Your very your very welcome 😊
  • YadnadYadnad Posts: 2,839Member Brian Blessed
    edited January 25
    worried33 said:
    The aids were provided via a occupational therapist, I also have regular safety checks on the bath lift from the company, I will get proof of this, thanks for the warning.
    So do I. They check the chair about once a year. All of my equipment came via Social Services. However even that being the case the assessor and agreed by the DWP that the aids I have were not based on need but on choice. Their opinion regarding the bath chair for example was that I am able to get into and out of an un-adapted bath as evidenced by the MSE carried out at the assessment centre - legs and arms were fully functional with sufficient strength being observed which is quite true. What was never tested was my back and hips which I cannot prove to be the root cause of my difficulties.
  • worried33worried33 Posts: 78Member Whisperer
    Well if they decide to be that awkward I will most definitely take silly points like that to tribunal, I mean any awkward assessor could rule that every single person in theory has aids by choice, I mean you can choose to not have a bath right and as such not have the aids, this just seems a silly and petty way to deny people benefits.

    So if you consider I can choose to not have a bath, I suppose it could be considered its by choice.
  • YadnadYadnad Posts: 2,839Member Brian Blessed
    worried33 said:
    Well if they decide to be that awkward I will most definitely take silly points like that to tribunal, I mean any awkward assessor could rule that every single person in theory has aids by choice, I mean you can choose to not have a bath right and as such not have the aids, this just seems a silly and petty way to deny people benefits.

    So if you consider I can choose to not have a bath, I suppose it could be considered its by choice.
    That's not what the assessor said.
    There was no dispute that the aids exist, the assessor agreed with that. But, they didn't believe that I cannot get into and out of an unadapted bath. They reported that there was nothing wrong with my legs and arms so no reason why I need that aid. To put it simply the bath aid was provided because it made things easier for me to have it - it was a choice not a physical necessity.


  • worried33worried33 Posts: 78Member Whisperer
    edited February 12
    After what happened on my DLA home visit I am not surprised I guess, I hoped you appealed and won the appeal.

    Did you do that?

    My GP has agreed to provide what evidence is necessary in "her own words".

    I am aware that may well get ignored, after all, if I have a f2f it will mean they not prepared to take mine and the GPs word for it.

    Do claimants have the option for a recorded assessment on PIP?
  • poppy123456poppy123456 Posts: 7,236Member, Community champion Brian Blessed

    Taken from the above link and all assessments are the same, whether it's ESA or PIP.

    Should you wish, you may use your own equipment to record the face-to-face consultation. This must be undertaken in line with the following DWP rules:

    • You need to notify us before your appointment that you will like to record your assessment by calling our Enquiry Centre on 0808 1788 114.
    • You will need to provide your own audio-recording equipment. Your recording equipment must be able to produce two identical copies of the recording at the end of the assessment, either on audio cassette or CD. Mobile phones and laptops are not suitable mediums for recording assessments.
    • You will need to give one copy of the recording to the assessor, at the end of the appointment.
    • You will need to sign an agreement that sets out what you are and are not allowed to do with the recording.
    • We will retain a copy of the recording for a maximum of 14 months, at which point it will be destroyed. We do not pass on the recordings to the DWP and they are not used in determining your entitlement or award.
    • Should you attempt to record the assessment without having contact us first and agreeing to the above guidelines, then your assessment is likely to be stopped and we may return your case to the DWP.



  • worried33worried33 Posts: 78Member Whisperer
    Interesting, for ESA its different, on ESA they supply the equipment.  Thanks.
  • poppy123456poppy123456 Posts: 7,236Member, Community champion Brian Blessed
    Yes they will record an ESA assessment, if you ask. You may have to wait longer for the assessment though. You can also record it yourself with permission and the same rules apply above, if you do. They don't record PIP assessments for you.
  • YadnadYadnad Posts: 2,839Member Brian Blessed
    Yes they will record an ESA assessment, if you ask. You may have to wait longer for the assessment though. You can also record it yourself with permission and the same rules apply above, if you do. They don't record PIP assessments for you.
    And why should they? Just imagine having to fund enough recorders for every assessing centre and for every assessor, every day. Who would you think would pick up the tab for that lot - yes us the taxpayers!
  • minniemoominniemoo Posts: 51Member Whisperer
    @Yadnad I understand what your saying but unfortunately because of a lot of lies that are written by the assessor (not all) this may have to be the way forward it happened to me they came into my home and the blaintant lies that where written unbelievable !! 
  • cristobalcristobal Posts: 97Member Talkative
    Yadnad said:
    Yes they will record an ESA assessment, if you ask. You may have to wait longer for the assessment though. You can also record it yourself with permission and the same rules apply above, if you do. They don't record PIP assessments for you.
    And why should they? Just imagine having to fund enough recorders for every assessing centre and for every assessor, every day. Who would you think would pick up the tab for that lot - yes us the taxpayers!
    Why should they?

    For quality control. How can they check to see whether the assessor is good/bad, what their interview technique is like, whether they need further training, if they don't have a recording of the interview?

  • YadnadYadnad Posts: 2,839Member Brian Blessed
    cristobal said:



    Why should they?

    For quality control. How can they check to see whether the assessor is good/bad, what their interview technique is like, whether they need further training, if they don't have a recording of the interview?
    If you are seriously suggesting that assessors are recorded at every assessment I doubt that many would want to work under those conditions. There has to be trust between employer and employee.
     
  • minniemoominniemoo Posts: 51Member Whisperer
    It’s nothing new anyway any call centre , council, banks, inc DWP , all live calls are recorded for quality call monitoring that can be used in a training environment or to be used as proof of what has been said face to face is no different 
  • cristobalcristobal Posts: 97Member Talkative
    @yadnad ..going slightly off-topic here for which I apologise...

    It is a serious suggestion, based on my experience in a previous employment where on occasions I had to QC interviews.
    When you say "under those conditions" you'll find that most people nowadays aren't bothered about being tape recorded - it's just the modern way and not a question of trust at all. Monitoring happens in a lot of jobs.

    Prior to tape recording the only other option was to sit in on the interview...


  • STANDUPOAPSTANDUPOAP Posts: 58Member, Member - under moderation Whisperer
    Sorry, but that's not great advice to base filling out the form on your worst day.  PIP isn't about your worst days. It's how you are 50% of the time based on a 12 month period.

    If someone fills out their form based on their worst day and when it comes to their face to face assessment they're having one of their good days then the HCP will immediately see through this and think "well if that's their bad day, they can't be as bad as they said they were"

    Always tell the truth and nothing more.
    So negative
  • ilovecatsilovecats Posts: 207Member Chatterbox
    Sorry, but that's not great advice to base filling out the form on your worst day.  PIP isn't about your worst days. It's how you are 50% of the time based on a 12 month period.

    If someone fills out their form based on their worst day and when it comes to their face to face assessment they're having one of their good days then the HCP will immediately see through this and think "well if that's their bad day, they can't be as bad as they said they were"

    Always tell the truth and nothing more.
    So negative
    Poppy is far from negative. She is one of the few people who always provides sound and regular advice based on fact and not popular opinion. She is always supportive so perhaps you may wish to rethink your opinion, especially as your own posts have been reported many times for aggression and incoherence.
  • poppy123456poppy123456 Posts: 7,236Member, Community champion Brian Blessed
    Sorry, but that's not great advice to base filling out the form on your worst day.  PIP isn't about your worst days. It's how you are 50% of the time based on a 12 month period.

    If someone fills out their form based on their worst day and when it comes to their face to face assessment they're having one of their good days then the HCP will immediately see through this and think "well if that's their bad day, they can't be as bad as they said they were"

    Always tell the truth and nothing more.
    So negative
    Would you like to give some reasons why my comment was in your opinion, so negative?

    I claim benefits myself, the advice i give here comes from my heart and from my own personal experiences in dealing with claiming benefits myself for multiple years. I have researched for years to gain the knowledge i now have and i would never knowingly give any incorrect or negative advice.

    My advice in my post still stands, never ever fill out a form or attend a face to face assessment and base it on your worst day!
  • poppy123456poppy123456 Posts: 7,236Member, Community champion Brian Blessed
    ilovecats said:

    Poppy is far from negative. She is one of the few people who always provides sound and regular advice based on fact and not popular opinion. She is always supportive so perhaps you may wish to rethink your opinion, especially as your own posts have been reported many times for aggression and incoherence.
    @ilovecats thank you very much for your support, much appreciated!!
  • YadnadYadnad Posts: 2,839Member Brian Blessed
    edited February 12
    cristobal said:
    @yadnad ..going slightly off-topic here for which I apologise...

    It is a serious suggestion, based on my experience in a previous employment where on occasions I had to QC interviews.
    When you say "under those conditions" you'll find that most people nowadays aren't bothered about being tape recorded - it's just the modern way and not a question of trust at all. Monitoring happens in a lot of jobs.

    Prior to tape recording the only other option was to sit in on the interview...

    For a start, the ESA assessments were only available to be recorded for the benefit of the claimant - it was never the case that it was used to QC the interviewer. The argument being put forward here is that the recording of assessments is being suggested to control in some way what the assessor does. Are we actually wanting the assessment to be recorded and then audited only to make sure that the assessor does their job properly? If that is the case where is the autonomous position? The assessor much like the DWP decision maker will not be able to form opinion or assumption on anything.

    My last posting within the Civil Service was to the Official Receiver's office as an examiner.

    At no time was it ever suggested that whilst interviewing individuals my position was subject to QC. Nothing was ever recorded - and still isn't to this day as I worked under the Perjury Act. My report was my report - I recorded what I believed was said and as such I could never be challenged on a QC basis. In fact it was prima facia evidence and as such was the backbone of any court proceedings as I had the individual sign every sheet of the written statement stating that the contents were the whole truth.

    If it was suggested that I had to be watched, listened to then you might as well have employed somebody less senior - my job was to extract the truth in a legal manner and record what I believed was being said.

    As in the case of a PIP assessment 90% of what is recorded by the assessor will be assumption based on what has been said, medical knowledge and intuition. If you want to go the whole hog and carry out a full investigation in order to avoid assumptions then the claimant should be made aware that interviews lasting 4+ hours would not be unusual. My longest was 6 hours without a break until I had the truth.

    The recording for QC purposes of an assessor would and should never happen - you will be taking away the very real reason why they are employed in the first place.
  • worried33worried33 Posts: 78Member Whisperer
    edited February 15
    I am getting CAB to help me with this given the clear problem I will probably face with an assessor making assumptions not in my favour, although I am expected to get the evidence from my GP before hand whilst my GP wanted the welfare advisors to request the evidence themselves, so I will have to get it myself as they want it ready for my face to face.

    The idea of me wanting the recording is so that if I go to tribunal there is the audio evidence of the assessment in addition to other evidence, when I had a DLA tribunal several years ago, the assessor made several notes that didnt match what I told them and even lied about my property, I provided proof of the lies about the property to the tribunal, the tribunal then decided the assessor wasnt credible and awarded me DLA based on my audio evidence alone at the tribunal, I didnt bring any new paper evidence to the tribunal (other than the proof that the assessor lied about the size and steps of my property), the only evidence they had was what was supplied to the DWP and my audio evidence.

    However given the way the recordings work for PIP I am not sure if I will bother with requesting one.

    It is interesting that the document that has information on the PIP recordings also states that the recordings are not used by the decision makers, yet on my 2nd ESA WCA the DM had listened to my recording, rang me up, asked me to clarify some things she heard on the recording and then based on the recording and that phone call awarded me a SG descriptor (the atos report recommended FFW and gave one 3 point descriptor), she told me this directly on the phone.  Is that different on ESA assessments as well or was that DM not following policy?
  • YadnadYadnad Posts: 2,839Member Brian Blessed
    worried33 said:
    I am getting CAB to help me with this given the clear problem I will probably face with an assessor making assumptions not in my favour, although I am expected to get the evidence from my GP before hand whilst my GP wanted the welfare advisors to request the evidence themselves, so I will have to get it myself as they want it ready for my face to face.

    The idea of me wanting the recording is so that if I go to tribunal there is the audio evidence of the assessment in addition to other evidence, when I had a DLA tribunal several years ago, the assessor made several notes that didnt match what I told them and even lied about my property, I provided proof of the lies about the property to the tribunal, the tribunal then decided the assessor wasnt credible and awarded me DLA based on my audio evidence alone at the tribunal, I didnt bring any new paper evidence to the tribunal (other than the proof that the assessor lied about the size and steps of my property), the only evidence they had was what was supplied to the DWP and my audio evidence.

    However given the way the recordings work for PIP I am not sure if I will bother with requesting one.

    It is interesting that the document that has information on the PIP recordings also states that the recordings are not used by the decision makers, yet on my 2nd ESA WCA the DM had listened to my recording, rang me up, asked me to clarify some things she heard on the recording and then based on the recording and that phone call awarded me a SG descriptor (the atos report recommended FFW and gave one 3 point descriptor), she told me this directly on the phone.  Is that different on ESA assessments as well or was that DM not following policy?
    Absolutely. With ESA you have the right to have the assessment recorded and they will supply the equipment to carry it out. Also the decision maker is well within their rights to listen to that recording and recordings of telephone conversations.
    Now with PIP, the government decided that they will not offer the same. You have to provide the equipment and any recordings made that are official ones, will have to be transcribed at your cost for them to read it instead of listening to it.

    The only reason why ESA went that way was because of case law that forced them to offer that service. 
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