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Trust me I'm a disabled doctor

Richard_ScopeRichard_Scope Posts: 1,614Administrator Scope community team
edited June 12 in Disabled people
An A&E consultant, a psychiatrist, and two junior doctors swap notes on being disabled in the medical profession. 

Read the full transcript here
Scope
Specialist Information Officer - Cerebral Palsy

Replies

  • atlas46atlas46 Posts: 763Community champion Pioneering
    Hi @Richard_Scope

    I cannot get the link to work and would like to read it.

    Could you see if it will open for you.

    Thanks
  • zakbloodzakblood Posts: 317Member Pioneering
    yes follow one on twitter, very helpful and a insight into what is a closed topic to most GP doctors on there ability and understanding on most disabled conditions, so hearing some with quite complex issues struggle in there chosen fields is somewhat of an eye opener 
  • Richard_ScopeRichard_Scope Posts: 1,614Administrator Scope community team
    Hi @atlas46 ;
    It should work now.
    Scope
    Specialist Information Officer - Cerebral Palsy
  • RoddyRoddy Posts: 281Member Pioneering
    Hi @Richard_Scope, An interesting read. On the other hand of course, are the so-called 'Disabled Medical Professionals' (Assessment Nurses) that seem to think that they have the ability to assess a disabled persons needs for DWP entitlements. They all seem to 'think' that they have a better understanding about ALL disabilities & illnesses than specialist consultants & doctors. These Nurses can work miracles, and every hospital should have one, for they can determine a persons health & wellbeing with a blink of an eye and a few taps on keyboard in next to no time at all. Diagnosis, sorted in one foul swoop. Job done and dusted until the next unfortunate is assessed.     
  • zakbloodzakblood Posts: 317Member Pioneering
    edited June 12
    Assessment Nurses, got to love them tbh, and it's not there fault, there doing a job, really untrained for, with just nursing backgrounds which cover overall very little in regards to disability, which is a skillset on it's own, not a light read after training is complete done over X numbers of days, then are dropped into the deep end, and are let loose on us, no wonder they fail so often but are backed up by the DWP who keep a high % of MR's which then go on to be over turned in this year ever grater numbers at Tribunals, so they were meant to fail from day one in my book, and now i've also found out complaining to the NMC means little also, as they do next to nothing it seems in the latest reports posted online of assessing or judging there own, once a formal complaint has been brought up against one of there own
    https://www.independentliving.co.uk/advice/pip-esa-appeals/

    https://www.benefitsandwork.co.uk/news/3938-8-may-2019-update

    and above for extra information and NMC / nurses complaints notes and findings near the bottom half, both updated to April of this year 2019
  • atlas46atlas46 Posts: 763Community champion Pioneering
    Hi @Richard_Scope

    Great article and very impressive group of Doctors, who have overcome difficulties, to the benefit of their patients.

    If you have to factor in, that all will be working different shift patterns, continuing professional development and revalidation every three years.

    They are in my humble opinion super hero’s and the NHS is a better place
  • RoddyRoddy Posts: 281Member Pioneering
    … On a wider scale of things, it would be beneficial for Local Authorities to have more disabled people employed to manage & run their disabled services departments. Some may argue that biased decisions could be made, but I don't see it that way at all. A better understanding about a Carer's needs for example or the requirements of service providers would be better addressed. After all, Councils don't employ Plumbers or Electricians to grant planning permissions or to run our car parks etc., do they?
  • zakbloodzakblood Posts: 317Member Pioneering
    the person i went to this Monday and the Bulwell job center as i had to send some MR forms to the DWP after failed WCA as they lost them once they accepted and signed for them tbh, it could only happen to me, i was met and had been assigned a disable man who had the same illness as me, so we got on like a house on fire and had a right good old chat, about everything and anything, but he said the DWP were brilliant with him as a employer and the staff really worked around his poor conditions and moved him around to suit how he felt on the day to day, so worked with him, not against him as he put it, then mentioned there is no lift there, so if he wants a break or dinner upstairs he has to drag him self up the steps, but was thankful that the staff toilets were down stairs and was very cheerful and helpful, so yes i agree it's shame the disabled aren't employed more, as i for one would love to go back to work and be useful, as atm i'm bored out of my head, always looking for extra stuff to do some days, then knocking myself out other days on meds to ease the pain, hate rain and damp and tbh any time the weather man says there's low pressure as while rain and damp makes me body hurt more, low pressure makes my head ache more, so it seems i'm some kind of a weather barometer so maybe a job at the weather station may be a good idea :smiley:   
  • zakbloodzakblood Posts: 317Member Pioneering
    Roddy said:
    … On a wider scale of things, it would be beneficial for Local Authorities to have more disabled people employed to manage & run their disabled services departments. Some may argue that biased decisions could be made, but I don't see it that way at all. A better understanding about a Carer's needs for example or the requirements of service providers would be better addressed. After all, Councils don't employ Plumbers or Electricians to grant planning permissions or to run our car parks etc., do they?
    also you make more valid points, as most of us are already getting paid, why not just use is anyway, as tbh it's not going to cost a whole lot more, yes i'm ex disabled and not getting a bean since i was kicked off in April of this year, so no money for 58 days so far, but apart from that, once back on, i'd love to be used and employed doing something useful for the money i was getting as long as they worked with me and understood i can do things, just not as good as others, or something for as long, and some days not at all, but hay ho, we can all dream i guess
  • RoddyRoddy Posts: 281Member Pioneering
    @zakblood, If you can predict/forecast six months of warm & sunny weather, then count yourself employed! lol ;-) 
  • zakbloodzakblood Posts: 317Member Pioneering
    global warming, so it's rains for a week solid in June, so we again will get a month of sun near winter, so i can burn my head as par normal, need to wear a hat more B)
  • RoddyRoddy Posts: 281Member Pioneering
    zakblood said:
    global warming, so it's rains for a week solid in June, so we again will get a month of sun near winter, so i can burn my head as par normal, need to wear a hat more B)
    … and it will be bright in the East and the South until it gets dark which will then move West and all of the way up to the North before Thursday.  
  • zakbloodzakblood Posts: 317Member Pioneering
    seems your prefect for the job and no i'm sorry i can only tell when it's going to rain, brain hurts for a few hours before it comes, with low pressure, then when it's about to happen and while it does, pain in the joints and body as a whole gets worse, one of the reason i put varies on every form i fill in and weather dependent, but also as a say please do me in the mornings when it's cold and damp or wet as well, when i'm at my worse, something they also don't understand on what a fluctuating conditions means, simply put, or even wish to meet me half way and when i say i'll do any day which rains at a hours notice, they just think i'm being odd, or more than normal anyway
  • RoddyRoddy Posts: 281Member Pioneering
    Nobody can fully understand another persons pain or how certain things will increase it. I reckon that 99% of people in the UK much prefer warmer weather than cold, wet & miserable. The elderly also suffer the extremities of Winter. It is obvious therefore, that certain disabilities & illnesses are affected by it too... It affects my bones very much indeed and rarely do I venture outside if it's wet or too cold & windy... You're not being 'odd' at all.
  • zakbloodzakblood Posts: 317Member Pioneering
    yep quite common indeed, but still seen by them as a no no, fluctuating conditions are part and parcel of the disabled, with no 2 days every being the same, some doctors and health professionals are fine and ok with it, some haven't got much of a clue while others, well not really suited to a caring profession really, as no understanding and little common sense and no desire to further themselves and help others more by learning the job which there being paid well for, lol, that's a rant and a half, but you always find a caring one, who has done the extra none default basis training and can understand, which does up to a point make up for the useless one who don't and can't and care less, this time my nurse saw me on a looks fine, must be fine care free approach and now wonders why i've asked her to be investigated by 3 boards, seems i went a bit over board on some of my contacts, as was told be 3 others, that one nurses are nothing to do with us and i'm sorry to your trouble, and 2 sorry we can't comment on nurses as we only look after doctors and then finally at the NMC, just paid lip service, but once i'd mentioned already sent to there nhs ombudsman, i got another later back giving me a case number and also a worker named to do my case against her, but before that, just a standard email reply saying it will be looked at etc etc, eg lip service, so maybe you spoke too soon when you said i'm not odd :p
  • curiousmom1996curiousmom1996 Posts: 35Member Courageous
    Sounds interesting. I’ll have a read. 
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