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CP and housing

janangjanang Posts: 3Member Listener
Hi to you all, my son 23 has mild CP and was diagnosed at 2 years. He has spastic diplegia and also a learning disability. His symptoms include poor memory, reading and writing difficulties among a multitude of others. 
His dad and I have fought tirelessly with the education system and now the work place for fair chances in life. He worked for premier inn for 4 years and now in Tescos cafe but it has been extremely difficult for him to get over the discrimination people show and has led to depression and anxiety.
He met his partner 4 years ago and she supports him brilliantly and they rent a studio flat which is not adequate for his needs. We are trying to very hard to appeal to the council for a ground floor flat but they will not budge on their decision. Any ideas would be helpful.
thank you

Replies

  • thespicemanthespiceman Posts: 5,344Community champion Disability Gamechanger
    Hello @janang   Pleased to meet you welcome.

    Thank you for joining and sharing.

    I am one of the team of community champions. We guide, advise and help new members who join the community.

    I am sure have you spoken to your sons Doctor about housing. Often can be useful.  A letter stating his condition and problems.

    @Richard_Scope is our information officer on CP.  Have tagged him in anything he can suggest, he will be in touch hopefully.

    Hope that helps.

    Please take care.

    @thespiceman




  • Chloe_ScopeChloe_Scope Posts: 5,841Administrator Scope community team
    Hi @janang and a very warm welcome to the community!

    I'm sorry to hear that the current housing situation is suitable. Here is some information about getting more suitable accommodation and moving house.

    This also includes a list of other organisations which might be able to help:
    Sources of housing advice
    • Shelter: Free, confidential advice to people with all kinds of housing problems through online housing information, helpline and face-to-face services.
    • Habinteg: Housing provider offering and promoting accessible, adaptable and affordable homes.
    • Ability Housing: Housing and support services that enable people to live more independent lives.
    • The House Shop: Find, buy, rent or sell accessible homes that have been built, adapted or modified for wheelchair users.
    Chloe
    Online Community Officer
  • Richard_ScopeRichard_Scope Posts: 1,709Administrator Scope community team
    Hi @janang 
    Good to meet you. This can be a very frustrating experience. I went through it in my teens. I found somewhere in the private rental sector but as you know that isn't a great solution.
    Have your son and his partner registered with the social landlords in their area? Getting an occupational therapist assessment is a good idea. This will help to show that his current property isn't suitable.

    My colleague has included some good resources. I would also make his case to local councillors, MPs and local newspapers etc.

    Please let me know how you all get on
    Scope
    Specialist Information Officer - Cerebral Palsy
  • janangjanang Posts: 3Member Listener
  • newbornnewborn Posts: 326Member Pioneering
    You and your son have done  really  well  and must  be proud  of youselves.    He has such a good  employment history  he is sure to find something  else soon.        With you and his girlfriend to back him up,  he really should not have to experience  prejudice..     Have you explored every last option  of unions and disability  and employment organisations to help, and to back up his legal rights to equal treatment?

    As to housing,  he could widen the search if he includes a) Swap sites and advertising for exchanges,  and b)   Looking at the private rental sector.  Mainly  it is a bit dearer than what housing  benefit  would give him, but it is worth checking the figures.

    In some areas there are many thousands  on the waiting lists for secure-for-life social  housing. The fact it is also higher standard and lower cost than normal tenancies makes it even more of a winning lottery ticket.  (That security from being thrown out, no matter how many neighbours have had their lives made hell, is a downside for vulnerable people in social housing,  if they are bullied by antisocial 'neighbours from hell'.    In private housing,  the landlord will be happy to evict an antisocial  tenant, which makes the neighbours safer.)

    A flat could be  on the seventh floor,   could be private  or social,  and could and be ideal because of course there would be a lift.  A lift makes  every floor a ground floor, and the higher ones have the best views!
  • janangjanang Posts: 3Member Listener
    Thank you very much for your advice, I also have a few concerns about the social housing and some of the anti social side. My son doesnt read situations well and would be vunerable to maybe try and get involved or give an opinion.
    However, cost of their little studio flat is so much more and not permenant.
    What makes me so angry is that if it wasn't for our support goodness knows where they would be. Universal credit keep cancelling their claim if they earn over for i month and then we have to arrange new interveiws to start it all again and perscription help stops which we didnt know so they charged him £54.
    Thanks for letting me rant and for all advise, I will try it all.
  • TobiasTobias Posts: 46Member - under moderation Courageous
    newborn said:
    You and your son have done  really  well  and must  be proud  of youselves.    He has such a good  employment history  he is sure to find something  else soon.        With you and his girlfriend to back him up,  he really should not have to experience  prejudice..     Have you explored every last option  of unions and disability  and employment organisations to help, and to back up his legal rights to equal treatment?

    As to housing,  he could widen the search if he includes a) Swap sites and advertising for exchanges,  and b)   Looking at the private rental sector.  Mainly  it is a bit dearer than what housing  benefit  would give him, but it is worth checking the figures.

    In some areas there are many thousands  on the waiting lists for secure-for-life social  housing. The fact it is also higher standard and lower cost than normal tenancies makes it even more of a winning lottery ticket.  (That security from being thrown out, no matter how many neighbours have had their lives made hell, is a downside for vulnerable people in social housing,  if they are bullied by antisocial 'neighbours from hell'.    In private housing,  the landlord will be happy to evict an antisocial  tenant, which makes the neighbours safer.)

    A flat could be  on the seventh floor,   could be private  or social,  and could and be ideal because of course there would be a lift.  A lift makes  every floor a ground floor, and the higher ones have the best views!
    Lifts often break down!
  • newbornnewborn Posts: 326Member Pioneering
    Not  so bad in a new build, and of course if there are at least two! 

    Mind you,  l have a puzzle for you.
    Any lift, anywhere,  including  in hospitals,  will be carefully labelled  with an instruction not to use it in the event of  fire.  .......errr....right, but what alternative is there?  Have you ever seen a little map showing  the  route to the stairs,? Have you ever, ever in your life, seen a  notice   telling wheelchair users  and others where  to go and what they  should do?

    Once, i asked  in a public building. The response was "well, those cripples have people to go round with  them, the council pays them, so they would carry them"   Another public building, another answer..."those sorts of people,  they get trained so they know where to go". Yet another public building......" they can just wait,  we get everyone else out, then the fire brigade gets them".   

     Another, when asked if there was an evac chair, took half an hour to find the answer, which was that "we think Sandra used to know about it, but she left two years ago, and probably  if the chair is still here it would be  in the cleaner's  cupboard,  but only the cleaner has the key, and she only comes for an hour in the morning"

    Another...My top favourite......."those wheelchairs  people,  they have it from when they are born, don't  they? So they know different  things, special  things to do"...........Mmmm....  what things???   Presumably , those wheelchairs  people grow up with the skills  to  make those wheelchairs leap in the air, crash through the nearest window,  then sail gently to the ground  by parachute........lf not that,  then what?



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