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Reading use by dates

tiggy19tiggy19 Member Posts: 2 Listener
I am assisting a new widow to cope without her husband/carer. She is now living alone and is severely sight impaired.
One thing I realised she urgently needs is a way to have a text to speech app for the dates on food labels. I've searched several sites, read articles about adapting kitchens, but nowhere do they cover this problem. Apps to find and then read barcodes for a description of the contents of tins and packets exist but can you find anything to find and then read out the use by dates?

Replies

  • April2018momApril2018mom Member - under moderation Posts: 2,848 Disability Gamechanger
    Hello @tiggy19

    I could only find apps that allowed you to determine if the food is bad or not. If you search the App Store, you can find apps that would be useful to her. I don’t think that such a app currently exists, you would have to read them out to her. 
  • mikehughescqmikehughescq Member Posts: 3,725 Disability Gamechanger
    My first question would be whether she is actually registered as SSI? Many people think they are because they have a Certificate of Visual Impairment (CVI) but the two things are entirely different. If she has been registered she should immediately ask for reassessment by her local sensory team in terms of her specific needs following her change of circumstances. If she’s not registered then getting registered would trigger an assessment. 

    It’s hard to advise on specifics as SSI is a symptom or description so broad as to be meaningless. Details of the specific condition would be helpful.

    There are three obvious solutions here:

    1 - use a tablet PC for online shopping with accessibility options such as punch and zoom or text to speech. There are numerous apps which will scan text and read it out. Just look up text to speech. MS Office Lens springs to mind for starters. 

    2 - RNIB and others produce talking labels. See https://www.rnib.org.uk/information-everyday-living-home-and-leisure-adapting-your-home/labelling

    Someone may or may not need to assist with that but labelling something with its title and use by date means that activating that label gives you that information any time you need it. 

    3 - The Be My Eyes app is probably the most obvious solution. See https://www.bemyeyes.com/

    If the person has an Android device I would strongly recommend moving to Apple/iOS as the accessibility options are vastly superior. 


  • Chloe_ScopeChloe_Scope Administrator Posts: 7,727 Scope community team
    Hi @tiggy19 and welcome to the community!

    I am partially sighted myself and can confirm all of @mikehughescq's great suggestions.

    I appreciate this might be something that you are really unfamiliar with if you have only just started assisting this woman.

    RNIB have a great helpline which also can provide carers with practical information, so they can best support the person they are looking after.
    Call us on 0303 123 9999

    We're open 8am-8pm weekdays and 9am-1pm on Saturdays.

    Our Helpline team can give you advice and point you to the services that can help you face the future with confidence.

    If there is anything else you can think of then please do let us know. :)

    Community Partner
    Scope
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