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Lack of knowlege

charlie79charlie79 Posts: 120Member Pioneering
edited October 31 in Mental health issues
Hi i was discussing with friend over phone about bipolar. Her understanding was very ignorant as she said that was just a poshed up name for depression, which I know isn't true.
This then bought to light I know they are both different but do not how. 
I would appreciate if someone could explain so when my friend uses her ignorance again I can educate her on the difference. I  would like to educate myself as well. 
I know someone with bipolar but there not really approachable at tye moment due to personal problems

Replies

  • EmmaBEmmaB Posts: 198Member Pioneering
    Hi @charlie79
    This doesn't really answer your question directly but there is a growing movement against giving people labels, as ultimately  they are value judgements (mainly from white, privileged people often in white coats) as to how people 'should' and 'shouldn't' behave:
    http://www.adisorder4everyone.com/
    A more interesting revelatory question  perhaps is not "what's wrong with you" but "what's happened to you/what's your story"? 
    Emma

  • Sam_ScopeSam_Scope Posts: 7,732Administrator Scope community team

    MIND say:

    What is bipolar disorder?

    Bipolar disorder is a mental health problem that mainly affects your mood. If you have bipolar disorder, you are likely to have times where you experience:

    • manic or hypomanic episodes (feeling high)
    • depressive episodes (feeling low)
    • potentially some psychotic symptoms during manic or depressed episodes

    You might hear these different experiences referred to as mood states, and you can read more about them in our page on bipolar moods and symptoms.

    Everyone has variations in their mood, but in bipolar disorder these changes can be very distressing and have a big impact on your life. You may feel that your high and low moods are extreme, and that swings in your mood are overwhelming.

    Depending on the way you experience these mood states, and how severely they affect you, your doctor may diagnose you with a particular type of bipolar disorder.

    Bipolar disorder and stigma

    Many people have heard of bipolar disorder, but this doesn't mean they understand the diagnosis fully. You might find that some people have misconceptions about you or have a negative or inaccurate image of bipolar disorder. This can be very upsetting, especially if someone who feels this way is a friend, colleague, family member or a health care professional.

    But it's important to remember that you aren't alone, and you don't have to put up with people treating you badly.

    You can read more about dealing with stigma on our page on stigma and misconceptions.

    Here are some options for you to think about:

    • Show people this information to help them understand more about what your diagnosis really means.
    • Get more involved in your treatment. Our pages on seeking help for a mental health problem provide guidance on having your say in your treatment, making your voice heard, and steps you can take if you're not happy with your care.
    • Know your rights. Our pages on legal rights provide more information.
    • Take action with Mind. See our campaigning page for details of the different ways you can get involved with helping us challenge stigma.

    Scope
    Senior online community officer
  • dolfrogdolfrog Posts: 347Member Pioneering
    EmmaB said:
    Hi @charlie79
    This doesn't really answer your question directly but there is a growing movement against giving people labels, as ultimately  they are value judgements (mainly from white, privileged people often in white coats) as to how people 'should' and 'shouldn't' behave:
    http://www.adisorder4everyone.com/
    A more interesting revelatory question  perhaps is not "what's wrong with you" but "what's happened to you/what's your story"? 
    Emma

    International research is beginning to describe and understand  many of the  more complex types od conditions that we humans may have to live with on a day to day basis. The problem in many instances oid that the so called  medical professionals who are trained to assess and diagnose these types of issues are not adequately trained to provide explanations in lay terms that most of the population will understand. Which is why there are  so many so called labels which most of the population do not fully understand and which can be further muddled by those marketing remedial services and pharmacutical products, who distort the real issues to sell their products.
    I have been in an online exchange with some one who recently told med that they are bipolar, and this person is works in another area of health services. To try to understand her issues I first tried to find some research papers which tended to be too technical for a quick understanding, so I went to Wikipedia where i found a useful Bipolar article . Hopefully you may find it useful
  • chiariedschiarieds Posts: 723Member Pioneering
    Hi @charlie79 - I have only ever knowingly met one person with bipolar disorder a long time ago, but still remember her. As a physio student I was asked to go & see this young woman with manic depression, as it used to be called, as she was only slightly older than me, & it was hoped I might help her. She'd been in a motor accident which had left her with a very badly fractured pelvis. Sometimes she was euphoric; everything would be fine, she was optimistic about her future, about which she would chat excitedly. Other days, she didn't have much to say, turned her face away from me & sometimes didn't want lights on in her room. Some days, everything was 'OK', & I got to know this lovely young person. On those days when she wasn't suffering the extreme highs & lows we made progress with her treatment especially.

    As with any disorder, I am sure there are many variables as to how a person feels with bipolar disorder. Stephen Fry has previously spoken most eloquently about his experience of having this....he is rather good with words!

    I don't know much about depression, but it can be seen that the person with bipolar disorder has 'swings' of emotion, where someone with depression 'only' has an awful low feeling.
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