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Gardening: Do you have green fingers?

Chloe_ScopeChloe_Scope Administrator Posts: 8,970 Scope community team
edited June 12 in Coffee lounge
Gardening could mean flowers, vegetables or herbs. It could mean growing the tallest sunflower or a herb gardening on the windowsill. Which ever you choose to do, gardening has been heavily talked about during lockdown. 
Rows of small black pots with little green shoots with leaves

The benefits of gardening?

You may have been putting off the odd job here and there until the bank holiday but seeing as self-isolating means we now have lots of time on our hands, it’s a nice way to spend time in a garden, on your balcony, or even gardening indoors.

Plus, there are many benefits to gardening, scientists have found that spending two hours a week in nature is linked to better health and wellbeing.

Taken from Independent (17th April)

What are you growing?

I'm fortunate to have a small garden which has slowly been filled with flowers and plants. I particularly like hanging baskets with flowers and our patch of wild flowers.

Yet I know not everyone has access to a garden. Alternatively, house plants can be a great way of bring some greenery into your space. They can be low maintenance and could actual help to clean the air! My personal favourite would be a succulent or cheese plant.

As an amateur gardener or a complete beginner, what have you planted in the past? What would you like to grow? Let us know in the comments below!
Community Partner
Scope

Replies

  • gaz1960gaz1960 Member Posts: 102 Pioneering
    Got my allotment, so growing runner beans, Potatoes, spring onion, carrots  and onions and leeks. And the same in tubs at the house plus 5  different types of tomato. 

  • gaz1960gaz1960 Member Posts: 102 Pioneering
    My son is doing his Beaver gardening badge during Lockdown, so we have a beanstalk, some sunflowers, radish, strawberries and tomatoes on the go. We have kept them alive over 8 weeks, so hopefully he will get his badge and we will get some nice flowers and fruit eventually. Really lucky to have a garden. @gaz1960 your allotment sounds good.
    A lot of hard work over the past 10 years or more,but worth it for veg that actually tastes like it should!:) 

    Must be all the horse manure KarenO. Lol. Omg. Lol. ;) 


  • gaz1960gaz1960 Member Posts: 102 Pioneering
    Hope your lad gets his badge! :)

    My lads were at beavers and all the way up to scouts and beyond! Lots of awards! :) 
  • Chloe_ScopeChloe_Scope Administrator Posts: 8,970 Scope community team
    My son is doing his Beaver gardening badge during Lockdown, so we have a beanstalk, some sunflowers, radish, strawberries and tomatoes on the go. We have kept them alive over 8 weeks, so hopefully he will get his badge and we will get some nice flowers and fruit eventually. Really lucky to have a garden. @gaz1960 your allotment sounds good.
    This sounds great @KarenO_Scope! Hope it continues to go well!

    @gaz1960, sounds like you'll be able to cook some lovely meals with all that fresh veg! 
    Community Partner
    Scope
  • KarenO_ScopeKarenO_Scope Member Posts: 16 Courageous
    @gaz1960 I used to want an allotment but with 3 kids and work I don't think we would have been able to keep up to it. We always try to grow a few things ourselves and really lucky to have a garden. I know what you mean about the taste. Hope you've got some good recipes.
  • KarenO_ScopeKarenO_Scope Member Posts: 16 Courageous
    @gaz1960 think you're right about the recycling. We have a compost bin too. Weeds are less of a problem, well apart from the kids blowing any dandelion clocks they find:D Keeping the neighbours cats off is our main challenge.
  • DragonslayerDragonslayer Member Posts: 41 Courageous
    I'm sorry to say I am not the best gardener around but I do like gardens and love flowers. My wife looks after ours. What I do like is Bonsai trees and I grow mine on the window sill. There is something  almost magical about looking at a miniature tree and having one in your own home. I only have one and it's my second Chinese elm. 
    I wonder if there are others that share the same interest?
    Thanks
    Dragonslayer.
  • gaz1960gaz1960 Member Posts: 102 Pioneering
    My great Neice loves blowing the dandelion "fairies" omg. 

    Both resident squirrels and a million different species of birds descending on the bird feeders and bird house,including a green escaped parrot, the starlings love cold Dominoes pizza ! Go figure!? :/ 

    And .....mashed potato! Starlings love it! OMG;) 






  • gaz1960gaz1960 Member Posts: 102 Pioneering
    Used to grow bonsai. But too much bother!' 
  • AilsAils Community champion Posts: 2,268 Disability Gamechanger
    Not that green-fingered myself, but I do enjoy pottering about in the garden and I do agree that it's great for our mental well-being too.  So far this year have planted some pansies and sunflowers so hopefully they will come up and grow.  I like to tend to the roses and the wild patch of our garden too where I love watching the bees buzzing about and hopefully will see butterflies as well again this year.  :smiley:
    Winner of the Scope New Volunteer Award 2019.   :)
  • chiariedschiarieds Community champion Posts: 2,644 Disability Gamechanger
    My small garden certainly helps my well-being, & this great weather has helped, when it's not been too hot! I'm growing tomatoes, courgettes, squashes, filet beans, peas (& pea shoots), miniature cucumbers, lettuces, radishes, beetroot, pak choi, leeks, garlic & achochas. I'm also growing flowers from some seeds I bought last year, & lots of nasturtiums....so easy to grow, & you can add the leaves & flowers to a salad.
    I'm interested in bonsai @Dragonslayer if you have any tips as to how to start; where to buy from, etc. I would be very pleased to know. :)

  • DragonslayerDragonslayer Member Posts: 41 Courageous
    I bought my first through amazon. There are many sellers. But start with a Chinese e!m and spend around 20£ - 30£ on  your first. No mre. 
  • DragonslayerDragonslayer Member Posts: 41 Courageous
    I spent a great afternoon in the garden with my wife today and helped with the gardening. Me a non gardener! 
    Maybe I am coming around to this gardening thing after all. 
  • chiariedschiarieds Community champion Posts: 2,644 Disability Gamechanger
    Thank you @Dragonslayer for your message, & for taking the time to point me in the right direction about bonsai.
    Think we're all getting to appreciate our gardens more right now....even my son, & I've been trying to persuade him for the past 4 years! :)
  • Chloe_ScopeChloe_Scope Administrator Posts: 8,970 Scope community team
    Some great gardeners! Does anyone have any pictures? :)
    Community Partner
    Scope
  • Crumbled72Crumbled72 Member Posts: 31 Courageous
    I love my plants. The greener the better haha! 
    Growing also bell peppers and both jalapeños and habaneros at my kitchen windowsill.. can’t wait to harvest! We were wanting to plant some herbs and tomatoes to the balcony too but since living non the top floor of a high rise the wind gets too gusty and no guarantees of enough heat and sunshine so left them this year.. maybe next year when the virus is not preventing to get all the stuff early enough. To be seen x
    All you need is L❤️VE ..and oxygen 😝
  • gillian72gillian72 Member Posts: 201 Pioneering
    @Chloe_Scope hiya Chloe , if I knew how to take a photo of my back garden an put it up here I would lol ha ha  no really in my old house I had a little garden in my front and had. a long wooden plant pot so every time I went in town I'd get a couple of bunches of plastic flowers form the £1shop I started  with the plant pots  lol then haerd an old couple arguing out side lol I didn't let them see me an they were arguing over the names of the flowers bless them then I got carried away an started putting then all round the garden I loved listening to people talking an even kids going to  Skool  pulling there mums hands to let see as I had no gate lol 





  • Karen777Karen777 Member Posts: 4 Connected
    We should b able to meet at some land if ok with or without a carer n do some gardening 4 the council orr??? I think sum wud find it therapeutic n there is plenty to do if we cud all get picked up or get to a destination as wen there we can still do social distancing if need be ?? X just n idea 4 Teessiders?? X 
  • matt59matt59 Member Posts: 1 Listener
    I've been in and our of gardening. 

    Had a small allotment at one point but it was a bit much to manage. Grew courgettes and marrow! Only because I forgot to get a few. 

    Miss it a bit I've a tumbling tomato plant at the moment. Not doing to well need a few more flowers.

    Do miss being in there as much as before.

    I've got a Chinese elm too dragonslayer. Its room shape pretty cool plants 
  • M_AnthonyM_Anthony Community champion, Scope Volunteer Posts: 309 Pioneering
    edited June 4
    I don't have a garden, but I do have strawberry plants on my balcony and I grow micro vegetables indoors. I had a Venus flytrap, but I found it really difficult to care for. I would love a bonsai at some point! 
  • Adrian_ScopeAdrian_Scope Administrator Posts: 7,121 Scope community team
    I love the idea of a Bonsai too, but that seems like a step too far for someone who can't seem to keep a cactus alive.
    Senior Community Partner
    Scope
  • phillycollings29phillycollings29 Member Posts: 57 Courageous
    I have an allotment.  I spend lots of time weeding which I really like because two robins visit me.  I am building a lighthouse out clay pots and painting it blue and white - it is about a metre in height.   I love my lottie - it is the safest place I have ever known. I am also going to build a little wildlife sanctuary on a raised platform with a hedgehog house and ant hotel (not booking in there!!!) and there will be lots of wild flowers for the bees and butterflies.  
  • fairybellsxofairybellsxo Member Posts: 44 Courageous
    @phillycollings29 I have always wanted an allotment, they look quiet and peaceful, I feel it would be a place of peace and quiet for me too, there are loads near to where I live, but people snap them up quite quickly! 

    That lighthouse sounds like a nice little project, please could you take some photos? once it is finished Id love to see the end result, the hedgehog hotel also sounds fabulous, my aunt has one and she has a little visitor quite often, wildflowers are the prettiest and very beneficial for the wildlife, I love it when bees buzz inside flower petals and it echo's like a flowery trumpet haha!

    My dad loves nature/wildlife and he has built a little bee house and has a section in the garden devoted to wildflowers/nettles, his garden is essentially an organised ' mess ' of plants and things for wildlife to love and thrive in, :)

    It sounds like you've got a lovely little sanctuary there :) and I am glad it's bringing you joy!

    All the best.
  • dkb123dkb123 Member Posts: 55 Courageous
    I have just moved into a disabled converted house provided by a Housing Association  with a through floor lift, I use a wheelchair so can't bend down, The garden is overgrown and seems neglected, A friend said, raised beds were the answer but I can't afford to have it done, does anyone know if this is covered by any grants or adaptions funds that I could apply for 
  • phillycollings29phillycollings29 Member Posts: 57 Courageous
    Hi @fairybellsxo
    Have you put your name down for an allotment.  I had to wait for 19 months before I got mine.  Just a thought x
  • dkb123dkb123 Member Posts: 55 Courageous
    the waiting time in London  for an allotment is around 3 years  
  • gaz1960gaz1960 Member Posts: 102 Pioneering
    dkb123 said:
    I have just moved into a disabled converted house provided by a Housing Association  with a through floor lift, I use a wheelchair so can't bend down, The garden is overgrown and seems neglected, A friend said, raised beds were the answer but I can't afford to have it done, does anyone know if this is covered by any grants or adaptions funds that I could apply for 
    Try www.growfruitandveg.co.uk

    There is a thread for people looking for allotments,and allotments available in all areas. 

    Plus people looking to help with gardening and growing veg,if people have available space,gardens,etc,in return a shared split of grown veg,costs,plus a  great way for  people to make friends and help each other.  


  • dkb123dkb123 Member Posts: 55 Courageous
    gaz1960 said:
    dkb123 said:
    I have just moved into a disabled converted house provided by a Housing Association  with a through floor lift, I use a wheelchair so can't bend down, The garden is overgrown and seems neglected, A friend said, raised beds were the answer but I can't afford to have it done, does anyone know if this is covered by any grants or adaptions funds that I could apply for 
    Try www.growfruitandveg.co.uk

    There is a thread for people looking for allotments,and allotments available in all areas. 

    Plus people looking to help with gardening and growing veg,if people have available space,gardens,etc,in return a shared split of grown veg,costs,plus a  great way for  people to make friends and help each other.  


    thanks I have looked briefly at it but seems a bit complicated to navigate, but will  try it out 
  • Chloe_ScopeChloe_Scope Administrator Posts: 8,970 Scope community team
    We planted sunflowers at the weekend. Also, the garden has appreciated the rain this week!

    How are your plants looking?
    Community Partner
    Scope
  • CJ61CJ61 Member Posts: 46 Courageous
    Struggling to keep on top of it at the moment but my garden is what keeps me sane....well almost
    Just one happy corner shown here
  • KarenO_ScopeKarenO_Scope Member Posts: 16 Courageous
    We've pulled our radishes, and some beans have appeared on my son's beanstalk. Our rhubarb has suddenly sprung into life and we have some fruit bushes with fruit growing, if our children will just wait for them to ripen. We have sunflowers, tomatoes and strawberries growing in the greenhouse, but we have not dared plant them out yet. Grass is a bit of a jungle though. 
  • Chloe_ScopeChloe_Scope Administrator Posts: 8,970 Scope community team
    @CJ61, that looks amazing! I love the shades of purple.

    Sounds like you have busy garden @KarenO_Scope! Do you have a plan of what you are wanting to make with the ingredients you have grown?
    Community Partner
    Scope
  • ConstructivewayConstructiveway Member Posts: 7 Listener
    edited June 22

    Nice,

    It brings even some extra benefits, healthy benefits

    I particularly like hanging baskets
    It'll be a community project and yet, it's not clear if it's not gonna be designed for someone disabled (in this case, it could be eligible for grants) but, perhaps, not (it'll be a bit remote, inaccessible). Yup, at the same, I like it too, I'd like to hang up shelves, grow in floors, economically, to multiple times use space by hanging up (e.g. in 5 floors, 10cm x 10cm so 100/m2 and 500/5 floors per 1m2) with led lights, a small wind power plant, automated watering, and some webcams connected to RaspberriesOranges or Bananas, and the temperature under the ground (4-8 feet, it's enough to avoid freezing and get the extra space). What do we know, maybe I find something from Etsy or Aliexpress when I/someone will be rigging, I wanna make it look good/interesting. When there'll be time, I'd like to build one (a greenhouse, in this case) just to show/prove the feasibility and price tags. 

    Regards

  • Chloe_ScopeChloe_Scope Administrator Posts: 8,970 Scope community team
    Thanks for sharing this @Constructiveway. :)
    Community Partner
    Scope
  • LouiseHLouiseH Community champion Posts: 91 Courageous
    I've got a yard which I've turned into a bit of a garden last year with a lot of help from a friend. I'm glad it was done last year as it wouldn't have happened this year. I've got a makeshift flower bed made from wooden pallets and painted blue. Theres a few potted plants too and a car tyre spray painted and planted with a Red Grandaisy yesterday. 
    Louise Hesketh
    Community Champion
  • dkb123dkb123 Member Posts: 55 Courageous
    There's no money around for community gardening anymore, councils are all near bankruptcy and because of the increased use of cards the old fundraising methods of shaking a tin for peoples change don't have much success, maybe we should start a new thread about how we can raise funds for community gardening projects 
  • ConstructivewayConstructiveway Member Posts: 7 Listener
    edited June 23
    dkb123 said:
    There's no money around for community gardening anymore, councils are all near bankruptcy and because of the increased use of cards the old fundraising methods of shaking a tin for peoples change don't have much success, maybe we should start a new thread about how we can raise funds for community gardening projects 
    DKB123, agricultural land is cheap. Maybe no councils, there's the option that you can take all financial risk on your own t-short. Either, we don't fundraise at all and didn't get anything as a nonprofit and we're are a nonprofit, we didn't receive any grants or donations, exactly £0. Also, we're an enterprise which isn't supported by any non-profit, council, even any moral/verbal support from the people who I take the personal risk for (I didn't see even one beneficiary that said something nice, only directors/CEOs of other enterprises, not beneficiaries) but, yeah, commercials like business realities, market analyses, plans, financial prognoses, and credit checks of your personal bank accounts... so you can get there. The country is full of CICs (commercially productive nonprofits). You need a commercial usage so your wallet isn't gonna bleed out, that's all. 

    400 square meters, 20 x 20 meters is 0.0988422 acre:

    "The average price of bare agricultural land in England and Wales has risen from £6,979 per acre to £7,030 per acre in the first quarter of 2019. Despite this, since 2015, agricultural land prices have fallen." (Agent Hub, p.1, 2019).

    It makes the price in pounds:

    The market average for 200 square meters:

    The market value of 100 square meters:


    Best regards


    Reference:
    Agent Hub (2019, December 13). Struggling to sell farmland? Here’s why. P. 1.
    Retrieved from: https://agenthubltd.com/struggling-sell-farmland-reasons/#:~:text=The%20cost%20of%20farmland,agricultural%20land%20prices%20have%20fallen.
  • ConstructivewayConstructiveway Member Posts: 7 Listener
    edited June 24
    P.s.:

    Check out FWI, to orient in the price ranges. It can go as low as 1300 per acre (even if the average is around 7K). For a greenhouse, the quality doesn't really matter (you don't have to seed in the land or for 1300 is better to say that you don't have to seed in the stones).
  • CJ61CJ61 Member Posts: 46 Courageous
    yippee. Im going to be picking my first green french beans to go with my salmon this evening. Ive grown a dwarf variety in a pot and they are only about 15inches tall but have produced full size beans. Hope they taste good  B)
  • Chloe_ScopeChloe_Scope Administrator Posts: 8,970 Scope community team
    CJ61 said:
    yippee. Im going to be picking my first green french beans to go with my salmon this evening. Ive grown a dwarf variety in a pot and they are only about 15inches tall but have produced full size beans. Hope they taste good  B)
    Amazing @CJ61! You'll have to let you know how they taste. Community dinner party at yours?  :D  
    Community Partner
    Scope
  • alieshiaalieshia Community champion Posts: 55 Courageous
    I'm terrible, I'm an accidental plant murder I'm afraid. I try so hard but always fail harder. My mum is amazing though! Her mum was too, I didn't inherit the green finger gene.
  • ConstructivewayConstructiveway Member Posts: 7 Listener
    edited June 27
    alieshia said:
    I'm terrible, I'm an accidental plant murder I'm afraid. I try so hard but always fail harder. My mum is amazing though! Her mum was too, I didn't inherit the green finger gene.
    It helps if you like what you do and choose to do what you like. Hm, I'm not a farmer at all because I've different interests and I grew up fascinated by nature on land with a huge garden so I know what to do. I'm not sure there's anything to inherit. In the same pattern as you, referring to the inherited, I could claim the invention of [neolithic] farming, the invention of [European/western] civilization, and so on : )), I claim "green fingers" : )) and all that belongs to non-nomadic civilization as anyone with Minoan Y-DNA can do. It's for a smile : ) You can see the "joke" : )) You're gonna be good at what you like, think, and concentrate on, what you spend time on.

    Best regards,
    J. Vysvader
  • leeCalleeCal Member Posts: 183 Pioneering
    @Adrian_Scope you could grow tomatoes on a sunny window sill easily if you use plant pot bottoms and keep them well fed but especially watered. 
  • janvjanv Member Posts: 3 Listener
    I'd love to grow tomato plants, but we don't have a garden and only a tiny Juliet balcony to work with. I suppose we could do some flowers in balcony planters, though! :smile:
    You could grow tomatoes on awindow sill 😁
  • Adrian_ScopeAdrian_Scope Administrator Posts: 7,121 Scope community team
    Not a bad idea. Although all our south facing windows are full length, so the window sills are permanently within reach of eager toddler fingers. :D
    Senior Community Partner
    Scope
  • kaiasparrowkaiasparrow Member Posts: 14 Connected
    I love gardening but I'm not great at it. I have a tomato plant growing and some pak choi and spinach that have just sprouted so fingers crossed. Hoping to have lots more next year but I only have a little courtyard 
  • dkb123dkb123 Member Posts: 55 Courageous
    What do people think of growing microgreens and which ones are the best?
  • Chloe_ScopeChloe_Scope Administrator Posts: 8,970 Scope community team
    dkb123 said:
    What do people think of growing microgreens and which ones are the best?
    I've never done this @dkb123. What are you thinking of growing?
    Community Partner
    Scope
  • dkb123dkb123 Member Posts: 55 Courageous
    I went to a restaurant, and they came with a menu of plants and asked me what I wanted in my salad  they then proceeded to cut off the greens from the fresh plants  and mix it in a bowl , there was Fenugreek, Pak coy, all kinds of parsley, cress, and cabbages, chia, they were very nice, the chef suggested the mix, he was very knowledgable 
  • chiariedschiarieds Community champion Posts: 2,644 Disability Gamechanger
    Hi @dkb123@M_Anthony has mentioned growing microgreens, & may be able to help. I've looked online, & found some info here: https://www.gardenersworld.com/plants/10-microgreens-to-grow/
    I didn't know you could eat radish leaves, so will try these as I'm growing radishes. My kitten has dug up my pak choi! My beetroot is coming through, & didn't know you could eat the leaves raw......it's good to keep learning.
    Try pea shoots too. Just buy a packet of dried peas, which is cheap, & they are not even too fussy about the compost you use....mine are growing in the compost of some of last year's tomato plants. See: https://verticalveg.org.uk/how-to-grow-pea-shoots/    didn't even soak mine.
    You might also find relevant info here: https://www.realseeds.co.uk  I've used this company for several years; look at their 'Oriental greens.' for example.
    Also do try growing nasturtiums outside. They too thrive in poor soil & drop their seed pods later in the year, which you can save, dry on some kitchen roll, then keep for the following year. Their leaves have a slightly peppery taste in salads, & you can eat the flowers too. :)



  • dkb123dkb123 Member Posts: 55 Courageous
    I see I will have to do some more research , Thanks for the info
  • chiariedschiarieds Community champion Posts: 2,644 Disability Gamechanger
    You're welcome @dkb123 - this is a great thread, as I feel we all learn a little from each other's experiences. :)
  • Chloe_ScopeChloe_Scope Administrator Posts: 8,970 Scope community team
    Please do let us know how you get on @dkb123. :)
    Community Partner
    Scope
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