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25th Anniversary of the Disability Discrimination Act, but what still needs to be improved?

Chloe_ScopeChloe_Scope Administrator Posts: 10,679 Scope community team

 On the 8th November 2020, it’s the 25th Anniversary of the Disability Discrimination Act (DDA). 

The DDA was a landmark piece of legislation that was a result of years of protests and campaigning by disabled people. The act made it unlawful to discriminate against disabled people in relation to employment, the provision of goods and services, education and transport. 

A sign saying disability is future

The DDA has since been replaced by the Equality Act 2010. 

25 years later, what do you think still needs to change to guarantee equality for disabled people? Let us know in the comments below if you'd like your answers to be featured in a Scope blog!

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  • Parrot123Parrot123 Member Posts: 137 Pioneering

     On the 8th November 2020, it’s the 25th Anniversary of the Disability Discrimination Act (DDA). 

    The DDA was a landmark piece of legislation that was a result of years of protests and campaigning by disabled people. The act made it unlawful to discriminate against disabled people in relation to employment, the provision of goods and services, education and transport. 

    A sign saying disability is future

    The DDA has since been replaced by the Equality Act 2010. 

    25 years later, what do you think still needs to change to guarantee equality for disabled people? Let us know in the comments below if you'd like your answers to be featured in a Scope blog!

    we need more houses for disabled people. Time to stand up and fight back the government do not care about us. i have just got a support worker after battling ill health since 2008 shocking
  • Tori_ScopeTori_Scope Administrator Posts: 2,113 Disability Gamechanger
    Thank you for sharing @Parrot123. I'm glad you've finally got a support worker, too. 
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  • Parrot123Parrot123 Member Posts: 137 Pioneering
    no thank you. Your a gem x
  • GarzaGarza Member Posts: 73 Pioneering
    I think things are improving for Disabled people, I do think both pieces of legislation are pretty toothless and can be widely ignored or bypassed by those who choose to, enforcement seems to be pretty thin on the ground 

    I would agree with parrot123 in that housing provision for disabled people especially in the social sector needs to be vastly improved
  • Chloe_ScopeChloe_Scope Administrator Posts: 10,679 Scope community team
    Thank you for this @Garza. Hopefully this will improve!
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  • MarkmywordsMarkmywords Member Posts: 419 Pioneering
    For me, it's simple; the laws we already have need to be policed proactively and have criminal penalties. Civil law after an event has happened is not working.

    The EHRC is an irrelevant smokescreen and should be disbanded.
  • MrAllen1976MrAllen1976 Member Posts: 259 Pioneering
    edited October 29
    I still can't get a job, every time I declare my disability I get rejected. Also, I've been saying for years that the DDA, and its little Brother the Equality Act 2010, aren't worth the paper they're printed on because the Tories don't enforce them and never will IMO.

    Also, when you're applying to places like the local Council where you're supoosed to get a "guaraunteed" interview under the 2 ticks scheme, the conditions are too harsh IMO, like last year I applied to be a Lollipop Man at a school in Sheffield, I declared my disability for the 2 ticks thing, they never even acnknowledged my application much less give me an interview.

    OK there'd be issues with me being a Lollipop Man due to my disability but that's beside the point, I should've at least gotten a punt on it even if I didn't get it.



  • SallyHSallyH Member Posts: 31 Courageous
    Because my disabilities are invisible I've had to deal with people telling me to 'prove' I'm disabled. It would be understandable if I was applying for grants/benefits/money etc, but usually it's just people at work or people who see me use a disabled seat on a train (Only once was it another disabled person who needed the seat, and with them I gave up the seat). Like, what do they want? My referral letter from my psychiatrist? The prescription I need to live a somewhat normal life? The damage my conditions cause to my skin and bank account? 

    And don't get me started on companies like WeWork who don't declare who accessible their offices are for people with physical and mental disabilities. Also, if anyone wishes to know, there's only a few London based Wework offices that ALLOW GUIDE DOGS. Not just normal, untrained dogs. GUIDE DOGS. Y'know, the ones that people need. Nowhere on the site do they explain this discriminatory policy. Nowhere do they talk about accessibility. Nowhere can you find if there's a lift, or stairlift, or anything to help those that have difficulty moving around. Surely if all supermarkets allow guide dogs, a bloody 'Progressive' co-working space should without question. 
  • SylviaMorrison72SylviaMorrison72 Member Posts: 17 Connected
    Hi all there's definitely more needs to be done! I'm currently fighting for my money back over a faulty cooker I have been without a cooker since 14th September I'm becoming I'll I'll with it been dealing with it for 2 weeks and been in store although I'm not going out as I have a extremely vulnerable son (23) I also have underlying conditions. I'm not sure if this is right place to post! I try to just get on with it till it becomes a problem! 


  • grahamfindlaygrahamfindlay Member, DPO Posts: 17 Courageous
    Garza said:
    I think things are improving for Disabled people, I do think both pieces of legislation are pretty toothless and can be widely ignored or bypassed by those who choose to, enforcement seems to be pretty thin on the ground 

    I would agree with parrot123 in that housing provision for disabled people especially in the social sector needs to be vastly improved
    Hi everyone - I'm Graham, I work for Scope, and I'm old enough to remember campaigning for a civil rights act back in the Nineties! Housing was a major gap when the DDA came into force, and campaigners and activists at the time were extremely unhappy that this essential element of independent living was missed out. Housing is still "exempt" from the Equality Act duties - bits of it like landlords not refusing adaptations are covered, but the fundamental right to accessible homes is still not in place. Do you think Scope should be campaigning about this issue?
  • GarzaGarza Member Posts: 73 Pioneering
    Garza said:
    I think things are improving for Disabled people, I do think both pieces of legislation are pretty toothless and can be widely ignored or bypassed by those who choose to, enforcement seems to be pretty thin on the ground 

    I would agree with parrot123 in that housing provision for disabled people especially in the social sector needs to be vastly improved
    Hi everyone - I'm Graham, I work for Scope, and I'm old enough to remember campaigning for a civil rights act back in the Nineties! Housing was a major gap when the DDA came into force, and campaigners and activists at the time were extremely unhappy that this essential element of independent living was missed out. Housing is still "exempt" from the Equality Act duties - bits of it like landlords not refusing adaptations are covered, but the fundamental right to accessible homes is still not in place. Do you think Scope should be campaigning about this issue?
    I think that would be a great thing to campaign for, that and better access to "public" transport, the fact that in the 21st century a Judge thinks we dont have a right to a space on a bus needs to be addressed in my opinion, luckily I am a car driver so this does not affect me but it is shocking nevertheless, can you imagine the uproar if this attitude was taken to any other minority group? but because it is the disabled it seems to be widely accepted 
  • GarzaGarza Member Posts: 73 Pioneering
    Garza said:
    I think things are improving for Disabled people, I do think both pieces of legislation are pretty toothless and can be widely ignored or bypassed by those who choose to, enforcement seems to be pretty thin on the ground 

    I would agree with parrot123 in that housing provision for disabled people especially in the social sector needs to be vastly improved
    Hi everyone - I'm Graham, I work for Scope, and I'm old enough to remember campaigning for a civil rights act back in the Nineties! Housing was a major gap when the DDA came into force, and campaigners and activists at the time were extremely unhappy that this essential element of independent living was missed out. Housing is still "exempt" from the Equality Act duties - bits of it like landlords not refusing adaptations are covered, but the fundamental right to accessible homes is still not in place. Do you think Scope should be campaigning about this issue?
    my personal situation regarding housing is that I am stuck in a too small 1 bed council flat, I dont have the means to buy, the council cannot or will not offer any alternativ and private renting is pretty much a no no for a wheelchair user on benefits I think 
  • davegregson40davegregson40 Member Posts: 65 Pioneering
    Yes, I too remember the Disability discrimination Act 1995, the Equality Act 2010 then combined a lot of previous legislation to bring it under that umbrella.  There is and are still some organizations that are not aware of employment rights or equality legislation and I believe we can strengthen the act. 
    Many will be aware that the act gets debated in Parliament on I think the 27th November where the adjustments for carers are discussed. I feel that there should also be protections for those who report workplace bullying and poor practices.
     
  • MrAllen1976MrAllen1976 Member Posts: 259 Pioneering
    Also, 3 weeks ago I gave 30 days notice to Talk Talk in favour of going with local Fibre and Landline provider Plusnet, I spoke to Plusnet the week before last, and they can't even put an order in for my connection till around this time next week when the 30 days with Talk Talk's up

    So if I wasn't living with my Parents till further notice due  to the second lockdown, I'd have no landline or Internet for 2 full weeks till Plusnet goes live the week commencing the 23rd of November.

    How the chuff is that legal for a disabled adult who needs the support of Family and carers? I do have a mobile but the siginal in most parts of Sheffield is terrible.

  • givingupgivingup Member Posts: 97 Courageous
    Government actually realising there breaking thier own law when they stop benefits from genuine claimants for pip, esa, etc etc!
    The lady I saw from my local citizens advice said she's been campaigning for years on this subject as the government is breaking it's own law!!!!!
  • Parrot123Parrot123 Member Posts: 137 Pioneering
    Garza said:
    Garza said:
    I think things are improving for Disabled people, I do think both pieces of legislation are pretty toothless and can be widely ignored or bypassed by those who choose to, enforcement seems to be pretty thin on the ground 

    I would agree with parrot123 in that housing provision for disabled people especially in the social sector needs to be vastly improved
    Hi everyone - I'm Graham, I work for Scope, and I'm old enough to remember campaigning for a civil rights act back in the Nineties! Housing was a major gap when the DDA came into force, and campaigners and activists at the time were extremely unhappy that this essential element of independent living was missed out. Housing is still "exempt" from the Equality Act duties - bits of it like landlords not refusing adaptations are covered, but the fundamental right to accessible homes is still not in place. Do you think Scope should be campaigning about this issue?
    my personal situation regarding housing is that I am stuck in a too small 1 bed council flat, I dont have the means to buy, the council cannot or will not offer any alternativ and private renting is pretty much a no no for a wheelchair user on benefits I think 
    @garzq you can get a disicretionary housing payment from your council
  • Parrot123Parrot123 Member Posts: 137 Pioneering
    Garza said:
    I think things are improving for Disabled people, I do think both pieces of legislation are pretty toothless and can be widely ignored or bypassed by those who choose to, enforcement seems to be pretty thin on the ground 

    I would agree with parrot123 in that housing provision for disabled people especially in the social sector needs to be vastly improved
    Hi everyone - I'm Graham, I work for Scope, and I'm old enough to remember campaigning for a civil rights act back in the Nineties! Housing was a major gap when the DDA came into force, and campaigners and activists at the time were extremely unhappy that this essential element of independent living was missed out. Housing is still "exempt" from the Equality Act duties - bits of it like landlords not refusing adaptations are covered, but the fundamental right to accessible homes is still not in place. Do you think Scope should be campaigning about this issue?
    @[email protected] Yes we need to stand up and fight. I want a home of my own. ty Will
  • Parrot123Parrot123 Member Posts: 137 Pioneering
    Garza said:
    Garza said:
    I think things are improving for Disabled people, I do think both pieces of legislation are pretty toothless and can be widely ignored or bypassed by those who choose to, enforcement seems to be pretty thin on the ground 

    I would agree with parrot123 in that housing provision for disabled people especially in the social sector needs to be vastly improved
    Hi everyone - I'm Graham, I work for Scope, and I'm old enough to remember campaigning for a civil rights act back in the Nineties! Housing was a major gap when the DDA came into force, and campaigners and activists at the time were extremely unhappy that this essential element of independent living was missed out. Housing is still "exempt" from the Equality Act duties - bits of it like landlords not refusing adaptations are covered, but the fundamental right to accessible homes is still not in place. Do you think Scope should be campaigning about this issue?
    my personal situation regarding housing is that I am stuck in a too small 1 bed council flat, I dont have the means to buy, the council cannot or will not offer any alternativ and private renting is pretty much a no no for a wheelchair user on benefits I think 
    Garza said:
    Garza said:
    I think things are improving for Disabled people, I do think both pieces of legislation are pretty toothless and can be widely ignored or bypassed by those who choose to, enforcement seems to be pretty thin on the ground 

    I would agree with parrot123 in that housing provision for disabled people especially in the social sector needs to be vastly improved
    Hi everyone - I'm Graham, I work for Scope, and I'm old enough to remember campaigning for a civil rights act back in the Nineties! Housing was a major gap when the DDA came into force, and campaigners and activists at the time were extremely unhappy that this essential element of independent living was missed out. Housing is still "exempt" from the Equality Act duties - bits of it like landlords not refusing adaptations are covered, but the fundamental right to accessible homes is still not in place. Do you think Scope should be campaigning about this issue?
    my personal situation regarding housing is that I am stuck in a too small 1 bed council flat, I dont have the means to buy, the council cannot or will not offer any alternativ and private renting is pretty much a no no for a wheelchair user on benefits I think 
    @garza i am homeless and they do not care. where i live in Lanarkshire. How am i supposed to keep moving in lockdown its impossible im so angry. I was illegally evicted as my landlord let my home fall below repairable standards. I am taking him to the first tier tribunal. How can a cancer chronic kidney disease, and chronic asthma move every 3 days. I feel like they are playing games with my life. I cannot apply for a up and downstairs house not allowed???????. I am in a 4 in the block upstairs with my Nephew. But had 1 offer a 1 bedroom. WE NEED TO FIGHT FOR HOUSES FOR US AND OUR CARERS PLEASE>
    '
  • Parrot123Parrot123 Member Posts: 137 Pioneering
    Garza said:
    Garza said:
    I think things are improving for Disabled people, I do think both pieces of legislation are pretty toothless and can be widely ignored or bypassed by those who choose to, enforcement seems to be pretty thin on the ground 

    I would agree with parrot123 in that housing provision for disabled people especially in the social sector needs to be vastly improved
    Hi everyone - I'm Graham, I work for Scope, and I'm old enough to remember campaigning for a civil rights act back in the Nineties! Housing was a major gap when the DDA came into force, and campaigners and activists at the time were extremely unhappy that this essential element of independent living was missed out. Housing is still "exempt" from the Equality Act duties - bits of it like landlords not refusing adaptations are covered, but the fundamental right to accessible homes is still not in place. Do you think Scope should be campaigning about this issue?
    my personal situation regarding housing is that I am stuck in a too small 1 bed council flat, I dont have the means to buy, the council cannot or will not offer any alternativ and private renting is pretty much a no no for a wheelchair user on benefits I think 
    @garza you can get help with moving. Discrecitionally housing payment. You apply away. Try make them listen. If that fails get mp and shelter involved. Will
  • kelly45kelly45 Member Posts: 13 Listener
    I have just had to leave a job I love due to arthritis in my back which is a progressive and painful condition, and my work have said they can't offer me anything less physical, I am also unable to claim pip despite appealing with evidence too.
    I've been looking at disabilities and working and as we understand the needs of one another, maybe we could build businesses run by disabled people.
    It would be interesting to hear others thoughts and opinions about this idea?
    And the pros and cons pleases 
  • Tori_ScopeTori_Scope Administrator Posts: 2,113 Disability Gamechanger
    Hi @kelly45 :) I've made your comment here into a post on the Employment board to get it some more views. 

    I'm sorry that you had to leave your job. Have you heard anything about Scope's Support to Work service? It could be worth checking to see if you're eligible to get some help from them. They're a lovely team :) 
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  • Blake95Blake95 Member Posts: 2 Listener
    I am part of a FB channel called the disabled people's channel and myself and some of the editors are very excited about it. 

    I lost my last job due to Covid but I am hoping to get back into work in 2021, I'm not rushing into work this year because I want to be sure I feel well and truly comfortable, especially with my seizures and my anxiety. In the past I have walked out of work places/interviews because they have been just so uncaring or biased that I have had to ask do you know of the Disability Discrimination Act. Speaking with some of the other editors on the Disabled Peoples Channel and what work life was before the act has been amazing
  • Tori_ScopeTori_Scope Administrator Posts: 2,113 Disability Gamechanger
    edited November 5
    Welcome to the community @Blake95 :) Thank you for sharing this. I can imagine it'd be really interesting to speak to someone about what work was like before the DDA! Please feel free to make your own posts on the community, or comment on any that catch your eye. 

    I'm sorry that you lost your job due to coronavirus, but it seems like you have a really good outlook. Very best of luck with it all. 
    Online Community Coordinator, she/her

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  • Parrot123Parrot123 Member Posts: 137 Pioneering
  • Parrot123Parrot123 Member Posts: 137 Pioneering
    Hello All, How are you all doing tonight? I hope you are all well 😘. I am looking for some advice if possible. Can anyone help me to get my child at risk folder. My GP does not have it. I have rang the social work. I live in Scotland. Any advice would be very much appreciated Will x
  • Ross_ScopeRoss_Scope Administrator Posts: 1,391 Pioneering
    Hello @Parrot123

    I see you've created a discussion for this topic elsewhere, that's great. I just wanted to say that I'm very well thank you, and I hope you are too :) 
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  • Parrot123Parrot123 Member Posts: 137 Pioneering
  • Blake95Blake95 Member Posts: 2 Listener
    @Tori_Scope thankyou for such a lovely comment and anything I find out I will keep everyone posted. Speak soon
  • givingupgivingup Member Posts: 97 Courageous
    Yes, we still need to fight for housing, should been included in the first place!
  • MrAllen1976MrAllen1976 Member Posts: 259 Pioneering
    Parrot123 said:
    Garza said:
    I think things are improving for Disabled people, I do think both pieces of legislation are pretty toothless and can be widely ignored or bypassed by those who choose to, enforcement seems to be pretty thin on the ground 

    I would agree with parrot123 in that housing provision for disabled people especially in the social sector needs to be vastly improved
    Hi everyone - I'm Graham, I work for Scope, and I'm old enough to remember campaigning for a civil rights act back in the Nineties! Housing was a major gap when the DDA came into force, and campaigners and activists at the time were extremely unhappy that this essential element of independent living was missed out. Housing is still "exempt" from the Equality Act duties - bits of it like landlords not refusing adaptations are covered, but the fundamental right to accessible homes is still not in place. Do you think Scope should be campaigning about this issue?
    @[email protected] Yes we need to stand up and fight. I want a home of my own. ty Will
    Is the Pope a Catholic? I have a neighbour who's Wheelchair bound and lives in a 1 bed Flat from the local Housing Association, but more still needs to be done IMO.

    For instance, due to both lockdowns I've been living with my Parents till further notice, and not at the Flat, I did go back briefly in late September but I was only there for a month before we went back into lockdown!

    Hopefully it won't happen, but I am concerned that if there's a further extension to lockdown after the 2nd of December, I could lose the Flat as the Social will say I'm not spending enough time there to warrant them paying the rent via HB, not my fault, blame moronic Clowns who have caused the second lockdown by not social distancing etc.


  • csno01csno01 Member Posts: 138 Pioneering
    I have found that things have become made more accessible these days, thanks to Technology.  Most recently, I would say making websites and documents  more accessible is a massive step forward.  This is just a couple of the many examples of what has changed over the years. 
  • MrAllen1976MrAllen1976 Member Posts: 259 Pioneering
    SallyH said:
    Because my disabilities are invisible I've had to deal with people telling me to 'prove' I'm disabled. It would be understandable if I was applying for grants/benefits/money etc, but usually it's just people at work or people who see me use a disabled seat on a train (Only once was it another disabled person who needed the seat, and with them I gave up the seat). Like, what do they want? My referral letter from my psychiatrist? The prescription I need to live a somewhat normal life? The damage my conditions cause to my skin and bank account? 

    And don't get me started on companies like WeWork who don't declare who accessible their offices are for people with physical and mental disabilities. Also, if anyone wishes to know, there's only a few London based Wework offices that ALLOW GUIDE DOGS. Not just normal, untrained dogs. GUIDE DOGS. Y'know, the ones that people need. Nowhere on the site do they explain this discriminatory policy. Nowhere do they talk about accessibility. Nowhere can you find if there's a lift, or stairlift, or anything to help those that have difficulty moving around. Surely if all supermarkets allow guide dogs, a bloody 'Progressive' co-working space should without question. 
    Meh, there used to be a Remploy Factory in Sheffield, bottom of Brightside Lane, they tried to get me to work there but I refused seeing as I refuse on principle to be plonked into some disability specific non job that pays 2 quid a day because all the clients are on benefits and therefore can't earn much without the DWP jumps on them from a great height with benefit sanctions.

    Although in 2008 I did 3 days at Reclaim, a similar project for disabled adults, stood up all day in a noisy, messy recycling Factory... How in the God's name is THAT suitable for a disabled bloke who can't stand up all day due to back problems? And don't even get me started on the joke of a "pay packet", £3 a day for 8 hours a day = 25 p an hour for that?!

    On the last day, I went Home and prestented Mum with ehe pay packet containing £6 and she was o proud! I was like, what? And went on a long swear word filled rant about unequal pay just because all the clients were disabled and on benefits.

    Nowadays such things are illegal! Good!

  • speedshrewspeedshrew Member Posts: 7 Listener
    Whatever fancy name they call it, it is all useless without enforcement.
    Yes things are better then they were considerably, but there are several things that get on my nerves. My biggest one is taxi provision talk about patchy at best. The amount of times I nave gone to places, prebooked a cab and the firm will send a saloon car and claimed I never asked for a wheelchair cab and drive off. I have lost count of when I have been stranded at train stations, or in the middle of nowhere!
    I also want to find work, but my disability seems to stop me. Talk about irritating!
  • RaySRayS Member Posts: 6 Listener
    The existing act needs amending to take out the many loopholes that allow organisations to avoid the requirements.

    Taking out the loopholes that include "reasonable" would be a good starting point. It's not reasonable to be left out in the cold and wet to wait for someone to allow access to a building, etc. . . . .
  • SusanfelixSusanfelix Member Posts: 8 Listener
    I applied for PIP and I told them about my disabilities. The wrote back to me and said "I've decided that you can stand up on your own and move 200 metres". In what universe? I haven't done that in more than 10 years!!!
  • newbornnewborn Member Posts: 581 Pioneering
    Sir Trevor Phillips said Disablism is invisible, institutionalised, universally practiced, publicly accepted, and, in it's effect on people's lives, is "in many ways worse than Racism".  (He could have said the same about Ageism, too, which is almost official policy)     There is no Equality when one Equality is More Equal Than Others.  The answer is to make Disablism and Ageism Equally unthinkable as Racism, and Equally as unlawful,

    In any policy or practice, replace the word Old with the word Black, replace the word Disabled with the word Black, and if there is still nothing wrong, fine.

    The thread on the Housing Consultation includes a link to the background papers, including the astonishing statement that an 'equalities impact ' has been carried out.  The senior civil servants who parasite on our taxes as authorities on Equality have declared....(.Look it up but you won't believe it)......... Having absolutely NO disabled housing makes absolutely NO impact on the lives of elderly and disabled people  (!)  
  • Francis_theythemFrancis_theythem Member Posts: 104 Pioneering
    Low-functioning people should be allowed a place in the world. I say "allowed", no one should have to feel like they're not "allowed" to exist in the world, that they have nothing to contribute. Too often I feel that people like me have no place in society. This is not okay.
    Social stigma towards illness and disability literally needs to be eradicated
  • newbornnewborn Member Posts: 581 Pioneering
    Wow, Francis-theythem
    That is a perfect post.  I want every senior civil servant and every M.P. to be obliged to personally embroider those words on a banner to be displayed at all times in  sight of where they do their work.

    It should be in every Scope window, too.
  • Lindsey54Lindsey54 Member Posts: 6 Listener
    I would like to feel safer when I go for walks.  If you are slow, having to pause often and use a walking aid like me, certain groups of people make you feel threatened and worried for you safety.  I had to take early retirement due to my disability, have found this hard.
  • csno01csno01 Member Posts: 138 Pioneering
    Lindsey54 said:
    I would like to feel safer when I go for walks.  If you are slow, having to pause often and use a walking aid like me, certain groups of people make you feel threatened and worried for you safety.  I had to take early retirement due to my disability, have found this hard.
    Hi Lindsey,
    i can relate to this, especially wanting to feel safer when going out by yourself.  Feeling safe is paramount I think. 
  • givingupgivingup Member Posts: 97 Courageous
    Totally agree we all need to feel safe when we,re out especially these days.
  • Lindsey54Lindsey54 Member Posts: 6 Listener
     B) I wish it were possible for me to disguise what is wrong with me and be as active as I once was.  I know that this is unrealistic but I am a bit of a wishful thinker 
  • Katie11Katie11 Member Posts: 3 Listener
    I have lived with Fibromyalgia since 2011 and have been battling M.E/C.F.S for the past two years (only diagnosed August this year after finally asking for help from the GP). Since being dignosed and admitting that I need help and support I have never felt so discriminated against.  I am having to fight tooth and nail for a Blue Badge, needing to justify why I don't look like I'm in pain or discomfort. My work have said that there are no resonable adjustments that can be made and if I don't like it then... The OT suggested to my work that reasonable adjustments should be made like allowing me to use the disabled space, no break duty, sitting instead of standing where possible etc and as a last resort a drop in hours may benefit.  My employer looked at it and said to me that if I take too much time off, or look like I'm not managing, reducing my hours will be the first thing they do whether I can afford it or not because they have a letter from a health professional that tells them they can.
    Last week, I had my performance managment the other week and was told that I am still giving 100% and that they cannot fault my work, however I am not my usual happy cheery self. This was followed by, I could ask you to leave it all at home... but I suppose it's difficult when you are tired and in pain.  It's bad enough that I feel so rubbish because of my disability, but having to fight for help as well not having the support of my employer (who was supportive until my diagnosis).
  • Cher_ScopeCher_Scope Administrator Posts: 1,916 Disability Gamechanger
    @Katie11 I'm sorry you are coming up against resistance in getting a blue badge and reasonable adjustments at work.  It really illustrates why much more needs to be done legislation and policy wise for disabled people to gain equality :(

    Scope have some information pages about getting reasonable adjustments at work and steps to take if you feel that your employer isn't doing enough, so please bear these in mind if you continue experiencing problems. 

    I hope you have better success soon, please let us know if we can help in any way.
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  • colpsteinmarkcolpsteinmark Member Posts: 2 Listener
    edited November 18
    I still can't get a job, every time I declare my disability I get rejected. Also, I've been saying for years that the DDA, and its little Brother the Equality Act 2010, aren't worth the paper they're printed on because the Tories don't enforce them and never will IMO.

    Also, when you're applying to places like the local Council where you're supoosed to get a "guaraunteed" interview under the 2 ticks scheme, the conditions are too harsh IMO, like last year I applied to be a Lollipop Man at a school in Sheffield, I declared my disability for the 2 ticks thing, they never even acnknowledged my application much less give me an interview.

    OK there'd be issues with me being a Lollipop Man due to my disability but that's beside the point, I should've at least gotten a punt on it even if I didn't get it.



    I am hi my name is Mark [removed by moderator - full name] for me faintly my comment about employment I’ve been working in sheltered workshops in the pub about seven assessment and I have been out to get open implement them that you only workshop I could have it going to speculate sheltered workshop with the close down now go there no more sheltered employment around now I’ll been trying for years but I’m not perfect I hope you like bye, bye for now
  • basket123basket123 Member Posts: 10 Listener
    Interesting reading everyones thoughts and how it effects them. I have personally had people scream at me , as my disability is unseen.
    Especially just now, getting the bus, not having to wear a mask, sitting in disabled seating. I often move for others that need, no thanks given. 
    The whole experience is a trauma for me.
    I have different people helping me, but often feel so alone coping with everything .
    Happy Saturday all.
  • MrAllen1976MrAllen1976 Member Posts: 259 Pioneering
    IMO because putting on and taking off the mask breaks my hearing aid I should be exempt, but officially I'm not because I don't have to lip read according to the fools in government! Falsehood, I do lip read!

    Jesus wept!

  • Tori_ScopeTori_Scope Administrator Posts: 2,113 Disability Gamechanger
    Hi @MrAllen1976 :) I had a look at RNID's information on face coverings, which has some advice on wearing face coverings with hearing aids, and also says:
    You do not need to wear a face covering if you are unable to put on, wear or remove a face covering because of a physical or mental illness or impairment, or disability.
    This means you don’t have to wear a face covering if:
    • you cannot wear your hearing aids or cochlear implant processor securely with a face covering
    • wearing a face covering interferes with your hearing aids or cochlear implant processor.
    You do not need to wear a face covering if you’re travelling with or providing assistance to someone who relies on lipreading or facial expressions to communicate.

    And anyone can temporarily lower their face covering while maintaining social distancing to communicate with someone who relies on lipreading or facial expressions.
    You're not required to have one, but do you have an exemption card?
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  • Tori_ScopeTori_Scope Administrator Posts: 2,113 Disability Gamechanger
    I'm sorry that you've had that experience @basket123. Do you mean that people scream at you for not wearing a face mask? 

    You're definitely not alone in feeling this way, many of our members unfortunately feel the same.
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  • csno01csno01 Member Posts: 138 Pioneering
    basket123 said:
    Interesting reading everyones thoughts and how it effects them. I have personally had people scream at me , as my disability is unseen.
    Especially just now, getting the bus, not having to wear a mask, sitting in disabled seating. I often move for others that need, no thanks given. 
    The whole experience is a trauma for me.
    I have different people helping me, but often feel so alone coping with everything .
    Happy Saturday all.
    Hi @[email protected]
    I am so sorry to hear of your experience. I too have had a similar experience on buses too, so you are not alone. It was very traumatic. 
    I did however pick up the courage to use public transport again travelling to certain places after taking a break. Since the Pandemic, I havent used public transport at all. 
  • basket123basket123 Member Posts: 10 Listener
    Tori_Scope 
    thankyou for mentioning about  Support at work, I have sent an email, as they may be able to help myself.
    Yes on how being treated on buses etc, I have had bus drivers stand up for me, as people have been so hostile
    Where I live the library has the sunflower scheme cards for people who are exempt, so I have one and one from the bus company. Its just Joe public who needs educating/ People don't like any one getting something different to what they are getting, crazy world we live in. 
  • Tori_ScopeTori_Scope Administrator Posts: 2,113 Disability Gamechanger
    Great news, hopefully they'll be able to help you out @basket123 :) 

    I can imagine that must be very upsetting. We agree that greater public understanding of mask exemption, and disability in general, is really important. I'm glad that the bus drivers have stood up for you before though.
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  • jae377jae377 Member Posts: 22 Courageous
    The major issue with the DDA or Equalities Act are that the Government assumes we can all afford to pay solicitors to fight our corner. Classic example, traying to buy a second hand vehicle and have it adapted. Dealers more than happy to sell a new vehicle and accept VAT exemption form BUT  try to purchase a used vehicle and have qualifying adaptations done. There is a laid down procedure for this. The dealer takes the car out of the "margins " scheme and sells it "Off Book" - simple No ? Problem is that that tells you what the dealer paid for the vehicle - VAT exemption is on cost of adaptations and profit margin. Franchised dealers for the vehicle I am assessed as safe driving and able to access easily ALL either refused outright or in 1 case messed me about for 5 weeks then stated they had sold the vehicle to someone who did not need adaptions. Whilst and independent dealer did help  me it meant I did not get the 2 years warranty offered via a franchised dealer. Whilst some of the dealers are possibly nervous about having their VAT records scrutinised as a result of having an unusual transaction showing I cannot believe that they are all "being less than honest" with their VAT.
    So clear case of discrimination - but who is going to do anything about it - short answer no-one, unless I want to take on the might of Land Rover on my own, with the costs that involves
  • newbornnewborn Member Posts: 581 Pioneering
    And that is exactly why Racism should not be more equal than all other equalities, the only one which is enforced without the victim needing to be a Bill Gates.
    Even the pathetically few cases taken by the old Equalities commission rarely cover disablism, and never ageism. Their ex chair Sir Trevor Phillips remarked  Disablism is worse than Racism, in it's effect on people's lives, but didn't  mention Ageism, which is also ignored
  • 5imply_Ted5imply_Ted Member Posts: 26 Connected
    I have epilepsy and need a carer on public transport. Trains are so expensive but the disabled persons railcard helps a lot. However, I bought my ticket to London for Xmas then realised I'd forgotten to add a plus one. I was made to buy a new ticket at full price for my companion rather than being allowed to add them to my railcard ticket. It might not be discrimination but it's downright callous imho to do that to disabled people on benefits.
  • MrAllen1976MrAllen1976 Member Posts: 259 Pioneering
    I have epilepsy and need a carer on public transport. Trains are so expensive but the disabled persons railcard helps a lot. However, I bought my ticket to London for Xmas then realised I'd forgotten to add a plus one. I was made to buy a new ticket at full price for my companion rather than being allowed to add them to my railcard ticket. It might not be discrimination but it's downright callous imho to do that to disabled people on benefits.
    Actually it IS discrimination IMO, and you would be within your rights to challenge their decision, OK I've spent the last several years saying that current "Equality" laws aren't worth the paper they're printed on because the government don't enforce them and probably never will, but they are there.


  • Parrot123Parrot123 Member Posts: 137 Pioneering
    @MrAllen1976 complain make a formal complaint. Best Wishes Will
  • MrAllen1976MrAllen1976 Member Posts: 259 Pioneering
    Parrot123 said:
    @MrAllen1976 complain make a formal complaint. Best Wishes Will
    I would've done but Dad told me not to make a "thing" of it at the time, plus I'd have probably lost if the case went to Court anyway, Gemma would've sided with HIM over me.

  • Parrot123Parrot123 Member Posts: 137 Pioneering
    @MrAllen1976 you got nothing to lose 1 call good luck Will 
  • Parrot123Parrot123 Member Posts: 137 Pioneering
    newborn said:
    And that is exactly why Racism should not be more equal than all other equalities, the only one which is enforced without the victim needing to be a Bill Gates.
    Even the pathetically few cases taken by the old Equalities commission rarely cover disablism, and never ageism. Their ex chair Sir Trevor Phillips remarked  Disablism is worse than Racism, in it's effect on people's lives, but didn't  mention Ageism, which is also ignored
    newborn said:
    And that is exactly why Racism should not be more equal than all other equalities, the only one which is enforced without the victim needing to be a Bill Gates.
    Even the pathetically few cases taken by the old Equalities commission rarely cover disablism, and never ageism. Their ex chair Sir Trevor Phillips remarked  Disablism is worse than Racism, in it's effect on people's lives, but didn't  mention Ageism, which is also ignored
    newborn said:
    And that is exactly why Racism should not be more equal than all other equalities, the only one which is enforced without the victim needing to be a Bill Gates.
    Even the pathetically few cases taken by the old Equalities commission rarely cover disablism, and never ageism. Their ex chair Sir Trevor Phillips remarked  Disablism is worse than Racism, in it's effect on people's lives, but didn't  mention Ageism, which is also ignored
    newborn said:
    And that is exactly why Racism should not be more equal than all other equalities, the only one which is enforced without the victim needing to be a Bill Gates.
    Even the pathetically few cases taken by the old Equalities commission rarely cover disablism, and never ageism. Their ex chair Sir Trevor Phillips remarked  Disablism is worse than Racism, in it's effect on people's lives, but didn't  mention Ageism, which is also ignored
    newborn said:
    And that is exactly why Racism should not be more equal than all other equalities, the only one which is enforced without the victim needing to be a Bill Gates.
    Even the pathetically few cases taken by the old Equalities commission rarely cover disablism, and never ageism. Their ex chair Sir Trevor Phillips remarked  Disablism is worse than Racism, in it's effect on people's lives, but didn't  mention Ageism, which is also ignored
    newborn said:
    And that is exactly why Racism should not be more equal than all other equalities, the only one which is enforced without the victim needing to be a Bill Gates.
    Even the pathetically few cases taken by the old Equalities commission rarely cover disablism, and never ageism. Their ex chair Sir Trevor Phillips remarked  Disablism is worse than Racism, in it's effect on people's lives, but didn't  mention Ageism, which is also ignored
    newborn said:
    And that is exactly why Racism should not be more equal than all other equalities, the only one which is enforced without the victim needing to be a Bill Gates.
    Even the pathetically few cases taken by the old Equalities commission rarely cover disablism, and never ageism. Their ex chair Sir Trevor Phillips remarked  Disablism is worse than Racism, in it's effect on people's lives, but didn't  mention Ageism, which is also ignored
    @newborn. It's not just racists,disabled,vulnerable,.ageism. All needs reviewed. Boris does not care about us. Never has and never will. He gives Universal Credit an extra £100 Disabled per month extra 0. We need to stand up and be heard. Will xx
  • MrAllen1976MrAllen1976 Member Posts: 259 Pioneering
    The Tories will never give the disabled the rights we deserve, they know it'd upset the hordes of Daily Fail readers who'd vote for a 3 legged Sheep if it wore the colours of the Tories, these people think all disabled are "workshy slaves to the Benefit system", falsehood! It's the fact that current anti-discrimination laws ain't worth the paper they're printed on IMO that means we can't get jobs, and any disabled person that does get "employment" is probably on some ridiculously low paid "government scheme" where all the "clients" are on benefits and can't earn much without the DWP jumps on them from a great height with sanctions.

  • Parrot123Parrot123 Member Posts: 137 Pioneering
    @MrAllen1976 Well said Sir. I totally agree i have a 0 work limit. I feel as if i could do something even part time. But the Drs have written me off i am not even 50 yet Will
  • MrAllen1976MrAllen1976 Member Posts: 259 Pioneering
    Parrot123 said:
    @MrAllen1976 Well said Sir. I totally agree i have a 0 work limit. I feel as if i could do something even part time. But the Drs have written me off i am not even 50 yet Will
    Indeed, 5 years ago they wrote me off as incapable of working, even though I've been doing voluntary work since 1994, and would willingly work a 16 hour week in a Shop or wherever as I've spent the last several years working in almost every Charity shop this side of Sheffield.


  • newbornnewborn Member Posts: 581 Pioneering
    I believe Dame JaneCampbell had a well trained team of advocates to swing into action each time she became ill, including pals in high medical places, in high legal places, immediate relatives and private doctors who knew the system.   She needed all that, because the N.H.S. had the habit of looking at someone like, say, Professor Steven Hawkins, and declaring "well, someone with limited movement and using a wheelchair has no quality of life, so ought not to be resuscitated or treated".   

    The same arrogant writing off, for people whose lives are considered of no value, clearly led to the covid19 patients being deliberately sent to infect care home residents.   Arrogance and refusal to listen to, or treat the patient as a person, (especially for women patients) was  identified by Baroness Cumberledge .  Disabled and old people are the main recipients of this "life not worth living" dismissal.    Think of Captain Tom.   The money he raised for these people was forty years after they would have written him off and let him die rather than permit him to live in his "useless" retirement.   

    Apparently entire care homes were told not to revive or treat, nor send anyone to hospital, and the so called 'Liverpool pathway' was a blanket sentence for entire classes of people.   It has been revived.  There is news of one example, a very fit woman  has been told that purely because she is old, she will be denied treatment if she ever needs it..(She was said to be number three, of nine, where number one is an athlete.)  Captain Tom obviously  had at least ten years of useful life in him, when he reached 90.  Other people have lived to be 110, even 120, and not in poor health.

    It is clear that various governments, for many decades, have been prejudiced.  Disabled people, Oold people, Carers, have all been ignored and despised, because they don't have a civil service union, or any union to speak for them, they are not holding senior civil service and policy maker posts,  and they couldn't riot in the streets .

    (Please, don't blame Boris or Evil Tories, not because anyone is blameless, but only because making it a yelling abuse contest between those with red football scarves and those with blue, merely distracts.  There is N O team of saints.  This has continued for decades, regardless of who held power.   The infamous 'Liverpool pathway' was hardly from a hotbed of died in the wool Tories.)
  • SusanfelixSusanfelix Member Posts: 8 Listener
    I have read on here that some people have been unable to get a job. I am a disabled woman and I got a job during lockdown! Would anyone like more information?
  • MrAllen1976MrAllen1976 Member Posts: 259 Pioneering
    I have read on here that some people have been unable to get a job. I am a disabled woman and I got a job during lockdown! Would anyone like more information?
    Yes please! I want to work in a shop, anything except clothes shops!


  • Ross_ScopeRoss_Scope Administrator Posts: 1,391 Pioneering
    Good to hear @Susanfelix

    What job did you get?
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  • MrAllen1976MrAllen1976 Member Posts: 259 Pioneering
    @Tori_Scope I contacted Support to work before the current lockdown, and they never got back to me from my original contact.


  • newbornnewborn Member Posts: 581 Pioneering
    Mr Allen and Parrot, this sounds silly.  You are both people who  can work, want to work, go to work, and yet are  are considered not officially able to work.
    The only possible explanation I could come up with, is if your doctor was trying to protect you from being forced onto an inflexible conveyor belt?  If you volunteer, you are working as and when you are up to it, in tasks you know you can manage.  It could be that other people the doctor has known have been able to work in certain circumstances, but the moment they are officially 'fit for work', they might have been pushed into going flat out to take a job involving working  long hours, with long journeys, and doing work which for one reason or another is too demanding?  
  • SusanfelixSusanfelix Member Posts: 8 Listener
    Ross - Scope I got a job with Sitel on behalf of Public Health England working at home. To anyone who wants a job, have you ever considered working at home? There are lots of work from home jobs out there not just avon. There is Call centre advisor, Customer service advisor and Bookkeeping jobs out there. The best jobsite to go on is indeed!
  • MrAllen1976MrAllen1976 Member Posts: 259 Pioneering
    Ross - Scope I got a job with Sitel on behalf of Public Health England working at home. To anyone who wants a job, have you ever considered working at home? There are lots of work from home jobs out there not just avon. There is Call centre advisor, Customer service advisor and Bookkeeping jobs out there. The best jobsite to go on is indeed!
    I would hate working from Home, constant phone calls would literally send me daft!

  • SusanfelixSusanfelix Member Posts: 8 Listener
    MrAllen1976 You could become a bookkeeper, you don't even need to be very good at maths because the software does all the calculations for you. Xero and Quick Books are the easiest to use and they teach you how to use it. There is also dozens of courses online where you will get a qualification. Sage50 is the hardest to learn and the most expensive software to purchase.
  • Tori_ScopeTori_Scope Administrator Posts: 2,113 Disability Gamechanger
    edited November 30
    Thank you for sharing your wisdom @Susanfelix! And congratulations on securing a job :)
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  • MrAllen1976MrAllen1976 Member Posts: 259 Pioneering
    newborn said:
    Mr Allen and Parrot, this sounds silly.  You are both people who  can work, want to work, go to work, and yet are  are considered not officially able to work.
    The only possible explanation I could come up with, is if your doctor was trying to protect you from being forced onto an inflexible conveyor belt?  If you volunteer, you are working as and when you are up to it, in tasks you know you can manage.  It could be that other people the doctor has known have been able to work in certain circumstances, but the moment they are officially 'fit for work', they might have been pushed into going flat out to take a job involving working  long hours, with long journeys, and doing work which for one reason or another is too demanding?  
    If they'd found me "fit to work" I'd have been took off benefits and been forced to work 60 a week just to break even on rent and everything at the Flat.

  • newbornnewborn Member Posts: 581 Pioneering
    Thank you for that explanation Mr A.   I suppose it is inevitable for a beaurocrat to want to make a system like a conveyor belt for inanimate objects,  which can never really work well,   because real human people so obstinately fail to be neatly rectangular!
  • Parrot123Parrot123 Member Posts: 137 Pioneering
    I applied for PIP and I told them about my disabilities. The wrote back to me and said "I've decided that you can stand up on your own and move 200 metres". In what universe? I haven't done that in more than 10 years!!!
    @Susanfelix appeal it good luck
  • Parrot123Parrot123 Member Posts: 137 Pioneering
    newborn said:
    Mr Allen and Parrot, this sounds silly.  You are both people who  can work, want to work, go to work, and yet are  are considered not officially able to work.
    The only possible explanation I could come up with, is if your doctor was trying to protect you from being forced onto an inflexible conveyor belt?  If you volunteer, you are working as and when you are up to it, in tasks you know you can manage.  It could be that other people the doctor has known have been able to work in certain circumstances, but the moment they are officially 'fit for work', they might have been pushed into going flat out to take a job involving working  long hours, with long journeys, and doing work which for one reason or another is too demanding?  
    newborn said:
    Mr Allen and Parrot, this sounds silly.  You are both people who  can work, want to work, go to work, and yet are  are considered not officially able to work.
    The only possible explanation I could come up with, is if your doctor was trying to protect you from being forced onto an inflexible conveyor belt?  If you volunteer, you are working as and when you are up to it, in tasks you know you can manage.  It could be that other people the doctor has known have been able to work in certain circumstances, but the moment they are officially 'fit for work', they might have been pushed into going flat out to take a job involving working  long hours, with long journeys, and doing work which for one reason or another is too demanding?  
    newborn said:
    Mr Allen and Parrot, this sounds silly.  You are both people who  can work, want to work, go to work, and yet are  are considered not officially able to work.
    The only possible explanation I could come up with, is if your doctor was trying to protect you from being forced onto an inflexible conveyor belt?  If you volunteer, you are working as and when you are up to it, in tasks you know you can manage.  It could be that other people the doctor has known have been able to work in certain circumstances, but the moment they are officially 'fit for work', they might have been pushed into going flat out to take a job involving working  long hours, with long journeys, and doing work which for one reason or another is too demanding?  
    @[email protected] I want to work but my Drs say no. I want to work.....sick sitting about. ty Will
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